Accessible iPhone Apps

The following article is adapted from some iPhone training material that Pat Pound created for special education teachers in June 2011. It describes over 70 accessible iPhone apps, and I thank her for permission to publish it here. Vision: A Guide for iPhone Users who are Blind was one of the first articles on this blog. It’s short but has Read More …

Blitab Braille Tablet for the Blind – Is it needed?

As someone who has promoted the Universal Design concept for decades, I was taken back by a Futurism video I saw on the Blitab braille tablet. It is billed as “The World’s First Tablet for the Blind”, but that’s not true, and it’s arguably not nearly the best either. That title, in my view, goes to the Apple iPad with all of its accessibility features, Read More …

Promoting Accessible Web Design at SXSW

I spent several days this week at SXSW promoting accessible web design in the Knowbility booth and gained a new perspective of Modern Health Talk in the process. South by Southwest (SXSW) “South By” is a week-long music & film festival with over 2,000 bands and dozens of movie premiers from all over the world, as well as a fairly Read More …

Bionic Eye Gives Hope for the Blind

Dr. Mark Humayun was going to be a doctor all along, but when a family member lost her eyesight, he soon began his journey as an innovator. “When I was going through medical school, my grandmother went blind and there was really no cure for her,” the Duke University graduate says. “And it made me rethink my career and focus more on Read More …

Vision: A Guide for iPhone Users who are Blind

I’m a huge fan of smart phones and tablets as the ideal gateway for home healthcare apps, but I always wondered how a blind person could use an iPhone since there are no tactile buttons. I was delighted to find the Assistive Technologies Blog, a publication of the Virginia Department of Education’s Training and Technical Assistance Center (T/TAC) at VCU. Read More …

Accessibility and Assistive Technology

In March I spent several days at the SXSW trade show promoting accessible web design in the Knowbility booth and gained new perspectives about building websites for accessibility and my own site, Modern Health Talk. While I’ve written many articles here about universal design and products built for various disabilities, actually using that advice myself is a different matter, so it was enlightening to hear Read More …

What Quadriplegics can do with an iPhone or iPad

EDITOR: 9 Surprising Things Quadriplegics can do with an iPhone or iPad, by Mauricio Meza, is republished here with permission. It shows how Tecla gives iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android access to people with spinal cord, brain, or muscular disorders or anyone else who can’t use a touch-screen, including quadriplegia, multiple sclerosis (MS), ALS, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, brain injury, and stroke.

Tools & Gadgets for Independent Living

“The Illustrated Guide to Assistive Technology and Devices” by Suzanne Robitaille reached #1 on Amazon’s Assistive Technology List, and I’m happy to republish this excerpt with her permission. This book has been universally praised since it cuts through the clutter surrounding assistive devices with a simple conversational style. It’s organized according to disability and easily explains the best type of Read More …

Why Color and Light Matter

Secrets for Improving your Sleep, Health & Productivity: Why Color and Light Matter by Leanne Venier, BSME, CP AOBTA (From her LinkedIn article. Also Published under “Research” in Texas MD Magazine, April/May 2015 (sold throughout Texas) & in TexasMDMonthly.com) It’s 7 am. The alarm clock starts blaring and you groggily reach over to swat it into snooze-ville, wishing for nothing Read More …

The next steps in Bionics

BBC Health News published Two blind British men have electronic retinas fitted this week, and it prompted me to re-post an article from last October, which includes a very good video by CBS News that hinted at electronic retinas. Now it’s starting to happen. I’ll let you follow the link above for details but encourage you to watch the video Read More …

Regal extends Universal Access to Moviegoers

I’ve written many articles here about Universal Design principals in communities, homes and products, and now I’m thrilled to say that moviegoers who are deaf, hard of hearing, have low vision or are blind can now experience movies at neighborhood theaters. Regal Entertainment Group announced that 200 theaters nationwide will offer the Sony Entertainment Access System. The system includes specially designed and Read More …

An iPad for All Ages

No computer skills required … and now no computer either     Everyone says the Apple iPad is intuitive, easy to learn, and easy to use. It almost seems tailored to toddlers and seductive to seniors. Grandparents and great grandparents with no prior computer experience can reconnect with family and make new friends online with email, social media, and video Read More …

The Future of Universal Design

By Guest Blogger Edward Steinfeld, ArchD, Professor of Architecture and Director of the IDeA Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access, State University of New York at Buffalo. The Future of Universal Design was originally written for Disability.gov, which is included in our list of government websites. From Accessibility to Inclusion Universal design (UD) is an idea that developed in the mid-1990s Read More …

Regulations Not Keeping Up with Technology

By Wayne Caswell The rapid and accelerating pace of tech innovation has profound implications for healthcare delivery & payment, aging, and disability employment, but regulations that support that are spotty or nonexistent. The good news “Durable medical equipment” is a class of assistive technology that can be paid for by Medicare, Medicaid and many private insurance plans. Motorized wheel chairs Read More …

Vision: What to Do When You Can’t Read the Fine Print

“EVERYTHING seems to stiffen up as people age, and our eyes are no exception. As the years go by, the lens of the eye becomes harder and less elastic. The result is a gradual worsening of the ability to focus on objects up close, called presbyopia.” In this New York Times article, Michelle Andrews gives lots of good advice and Read More …

Stem Cells and Age-related Macular Degeneration

Stem Cell Research Moves One Step Closer To Curing Age-Related Macular Degeneration By Troy Cole The leading cause of loss of vision in people over 50 is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), which causes damage to an area near the center of the retina called the “macula.” Primarily impacting central vision, this damaged area tends to grow as the disease progresses, causing Read More …

Bringing Dead Back to Life & Envisioning a Healthy Future

The beginning (or end) of a year is a good time to remember & reflect on the past while pondering & planning the future. So today’s post comes from Huffington Post, with ties into other articles about Personal Memoirs & Memories, Perpetual Websites & Memorials, the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show, and Future Forecasts. It’s about the well-known futurist and inventor, Ray Kurzweil. Recalling Read More …