Trumpcare will kill more Americans than Terrorists have

Trumpcare protesters say, "We need Care, not Chaos."

Today I commented on The Senate’s Trumpcare Bill Will Kill 50 Times More Americans Than Terrorists Have. This FORBES article frames the issue in a way that puts the large numbers in perspective.

According to the bipartisan Congressional Budget Office, “15 million people losing insurance translates to at least 18,000 preventable American deaths.” If Republicans simply repeal Obamacare instead, 38,400 would die – or 100 times more than Terrorists have killed. Do I have your attention yet?

My Comment:

Forget politics and ideology for a moment, and look at healthcare from a business perspective, but ignoring the spin of the industry itself. To improve profits, you can either cut costs or increase revenue, or do both. Read More …

10th Apple iPhone Anniversary and Computing Progress

Apple iPhone - 10 years later Before Steve Jobs died, he introduced the Apple iPhone at the Macworld convention in January 2007. The first iPhone units actually shipped to the public on June 29, 2007, so today marks the 10th iPhone anniversary.

This is a good time to look back on the past and project ahead to the future of tech-enabled healthcare. That future will be driven by the exponentially accelerating pace of tech innovation that we call Moore’s Law. Intel co-founder Gordon Moore first observed the trend of circuits and components getting two times smaller, faster and cheaper every year or two.

In Moore’s Law and the FUTURE of Healthcare, I explored that trend and the eventual blending of science and technology (INFO + BIO + NANO + NEURO). We’re already seeing the effects, with the ability of many doctor functions to move down-market from hospitals & clinics to consumers at home. A continuation of that trend will have a profound effect on future healthcare, as I’ve already written about many times on this blog. Future-MooresLaw

In my Moore’s Law article I described the IBM System/370 Model 158-3 mainframe computer that I worked on in the early-1970s as a computer operator. It cost about $3.5M, required a large computer room, and consumed so much electricity that liquid cooling of the processor was needed to supplement room air conditioning. I compared it to an iPhone 4S, which then had 100 times more memory, was thousands of times faster, and had wireless access to the Internet, running on batteries.

We often take for granted how much compute capacity we carry in our pocket — more than it took to land a man on the moon — so as we imagine the future, it’s helpful to reflect on just how far we’ve come, and how fast. Read More …

A Single-Payer Healthcare System for All Americans

Will Fisher Explains Single Payer With Jelly Beans

Watch Will Fisher Explain Single Payer With Jelly Beans (YOUTUBE)

For most of us, getting healthcare in this country is way too hard, as the video at the end shows. So to those in Congress who would make it even harder, I say, “Keep It Simple, Stupid,” with a single-payer system providing universal coverage and healthcare for all.

Because so few people know what single-payer is, Will Fisher uses jelly-beans to explain it. To begin with, single-payer is NOT where the government employs the doctors and directly provides the care. That would be single-provider care.

Will’s jelly-bean analogy shows how we currently Pay for care and the savings from a single-payer system. But read on to see why even Bernie Sanders’ Medicare-for-All plan, doesn’t go far enough to achieve the far greater savings potential I so often write about.
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The Aging World – Infographic about global aging

The Aging World - How older generations are affecting countries around the globe

By Matt Zajechowski

During the Middle Ages, English poet Geoffrey Chaucer wrote, “Time and tide wait for no man.” Back then, life expectancy was 45 years old, thanks to disease like the bubonic plague, wars, and low infant mortality rates. With the vast, modern improvements in healthcare, hygiene, and diet, populations today can expect much longer, healthy life spans. But living longer has an impact elsewhere, including on the economy and the division of labor and care. Check out The Aging World infographic below to see where older populations are increasing and how they’re affecting the economy. Read More …

Stratus Video Call Center is like a Virtual Waiting Room

Stratus Video Call Center(Reposted — originally published 11/9/2011) As healthcare providers gear up for telehealth, they’ll face new issues such as 24×7 remote monitoring and the need to support virtual doctor visits by telepresence over the Internet. I wrote before here and here, there must be compatibility among different video systems, including the enterprise class-systems in hospitals and consumer-class systems in PC & mobile devices.

Until today, the two prominent solutions I knew about  were Vidyo and a Lifesize Communications technology called ClearSea. Both are cloud-based services that translate between incompatible video systems, but now there’s another option.

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Let’s Change the way we see Health Care

Rather than a Wall, America needs to build a Giant Mirror to reflect on what we've become.

Rather than argue over who pays for what and who gets health insurance or access to care, and who doesn’t, maybe we need to step back and ask different questions, starting with…

“Is basic health care a human right, or is it an earned privilege?”

And if people can’t afford it, does that mean they aren’t working hard enough, aren’t determined enough, or are just Losers and don’t deserve it? Read More …

When Caregiver Robots Come for Grandma

Failing the Third Machine Age: When [Caregiver] Robots Come for GrandmaWhen Robots Come for Grandma is a long and thought-provoking article by Zeynep Tufekci, published in 2014. It builds a case against “caregiver robots,” arguing that they are both inhumane and economically destructive. She got me thinking, and I hope this has the same effect on you.

I would have liked to add my own perspectives and contrarian view with links to related articles here at Modern Health Talk. I’d start with Will Robots Take Over in Health Care? Unfortunately there was no space to add comments, so I use her article as a basis for mine and hope you’ll share your thoughts in the space I give below. Read More …

FCC Broadband Health Imperative – how we responded

FCC Broadband Health Initiative - Modern Health Talk respondsAs a retired IBM technologist, market strategist, futurist, consumer advocate, and founding editor of Modern Health Talk, I am please to respond to this FCC action and will describe my background afterwards. What follows is the detailed docket (16-46) with my responses inserted and key points highlighted. Read More …

People Like the ACA, so it’s hard to Repeal. Here’s why.

It’s not surprising that so many people like the ACA (Affordable Care Act), and that it’s been difficult for Republicans to repeal.

ACA (Obamacare) versus AHCA

Here are 12 reasons people like the ACA (also known as Obamacare), along with detail in supporting charts that compare it with the Republican’s American Health Care Act (AHCA). Most of this work is attributed to The Century Foundation.

1.  The uninsured rate across all ages and income levels has fallen to the lowest level on record, thanks to the ACA’s health insurance exchanges, Medicaid expansion, and other provisions.

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Ask the Right Questions about Healthcare

Politicians Need to Ask the Right Questions about Healthcare (Photo credit: SupremePatriot.com)

By Wayne Caswell, Founder of Modern Health Talk

Politicians Need to Ask the Right Questions about Healthcare

In Healthcare: Mandatory Coverage or Universal Access?, Dr. Josh Luke presents one perspective – that of a hospital CEO. Readers should know that he represents the medical industrial complex, which also includes insurers, drug companies, equipment providers, and testing companies. Their collective interest is to protect the perverse profits that come from illness and injury, and the fee-for-service incentives that encourage ongoing treatment of symptoms. I found Dr. Lukes’ framing of the healthcare issue too partisan, so I had to respond. My responses form the basis of today’s posting.

What’s the DIFFERENCE between Universal Healthcare and Universal Access? Republican politicians have promoted Universal Access, confusing it with Universal Healthcare. Access, however, only means you can get health care if you can afford it. That’s like having the ability to buy a luxury yacht or summer home, but only if you have enough money to afford it. Progressives instead want Universal Healthcare, a concept I endorse here at Modern Health Talk. It’s efficient and what other advanced nations have. So let’s reframe the issue by asking different questions.  Read More …

American Health Care Act, a Summary & UPDATE

 

By Wayne Caswell, founding editor

UPDATE 3/24/2017 — Not enough Republicans agreed to pass the American Health Care Act, which would repeal much of Obamacare and kill thousands of Americans by leaving them without health care, so they pulled it.

UPDATE 3/24/2017 — Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives scheduled a critical vote today but could not secure enough votes within their own party to pass the American Health Care Act. So Speaker Paul Ryan and and President Trump decided to pulled it. The bill to partially repeal Obamacare would partially fulfill a campaign promise and give tax breaks to wealthy benefactors, but it would also steal from the Medicare Trust Fund, gut Medicaid, and result in the deaths of Americans by leaving them without health care. Pulling the bill was a better option than facing angry constituents, 85% of whom were against it. Read More …

Healthcare as Public Utility

healthcare as a public utility - image of health care practitioner with handheld mobile deviceComputing functions once associated with PCs are moving back to big servers in the Internet Cloud, leaving mobile client devices to handle the user interface (UI) but not the data storage and analysis. I find this shift especially interesting, having grown up in the mainframe world at IBM as computing functions moved to PCs.

In the case of speech recognition and Apple’s SIRI artificial intelligence, even the UI function is now split between client & server. This has huge implications for healthcare, with IBM’s Watson and AT&T’s analytics engine aimed at different parts of the healthcare problem.

The networked mobile device (phone, tablet, etc.) will serve as a health gateway between a host of medical & environmental sensors and cloud-based services that collect & analyze the collected data. The benefits will not just target individual patients but be applied across large populations.

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Wall-E, End of Work, and Universal Basic Income

EDITOR’S NOTE:  I’m reposting this article with new information from a U.N. report that warns countries to prepare for the day when technology, automation, and artificial intelligence replaces jobs. They expect 75% of the world population to become unemployable, and that day is coming sooner than most people realize. It will have immense social consequences.

Wall-E is a fun & warm-hearted animated movie by Pixar that also warns against ignoring environmental pollution and the obesity epidemic. It presents future humans as super-obese couch potatoes living in a robot & technology-dominated world set some 700 years in the future. By then, mankind had so completely trashed Earth’s environment that humans were forced to relocate to spaceships and evolved into large, floating fat blobs – the Axioms.

But the future doesn’t have to be as foretold. We learned that from the classic movie, A Christmas Carol. By knowing the risks of possible futures that our current behavior may take us to, we can change. We can change course to save the environment, improve our health & well being, and find solutions to wide unemployment.

I hope you enjoy the video clips below, as well as the additional links and discussion that follows.

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Medical Errors versus Malpractice Lawsuits

Medical Errors versus Malpractice Lawsuits

With every legislative session, lawmakers seem to further reduce the rights of people injured by medical errors and malpractice.

Often described as a form of corporate welfare, Tort Reform makes it more difficult for people to file lawsuits and caps any award they get for damages. Some states even require the losing party to pay the court costs of the opposing party, making malpractice lawsuits extremely risky for individuals facing opponents with deep pockets. Read More …

Why Republicans Want to Repeal Obamacare

Robert Reich on Why Republicans want to Repeal Obamacare

Here’s what Reich says about an Obamacare repeal:

  • 32 million people will lose coverage, [23M-24M if replaced with Senate or House versions, per CBO]
  • Tens of thousands of American’s will die as a result (over 50 times as many as killed by terrorists),
  • Medicare and Medicaid will be left in worse shape, and
  • The rich will get richer in a massive redistribution of wealth.

Missing from this list, and discussed after the video, is what appears to be racist resentment of having a black President in the White House, no matter how qualified. Repeal is also pragmatic, because it helps Republicans contain a demographic shift works against them and maintain control of Congress, the Presidency and the Supreme Court. Read More …

Influencing Healthcare Policy – Lobbying, Incentives & Insurance

Benjamin Franklin is credited as saying, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," but policymakers seem more influenced by the money he's pictured on.

Ben Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” but policymakers seem more influenced by the money he’s pictured on.

By Wayne Caswell, Founding Editor, Modern Health Talk

As President Trump’s administration transitions from the Obama era, a conservative ideological shift will influence healthcare policy, but so will other factors. They are discussed here, based on my response to “The Past, Present and Future of Healthcare Policy” at ReferralMD.

Influencing Healthcare Policy

Although The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as ObamaCare, has flattened the curve to the lowest annual cost increase in decades, it still has not reduced overall costs for many reasons. These include (1) special interest lobbying to protect industry revenues & profit, (2) misaligned incentives, and (3) an insurance middleman that adds more cost than value. It is unlikely that any “repeal and replace” strategy can live up to Trump’s promises because of these three factors. Read More …

US Healthcare System has Cancer. Can Trump Fix it?

By Wayne Caswell, founding editor, Modern Health Talk

Dr. Sudip Bose says, "The epicenter of health care is the doctor-patient relationship."

Opening his January 16, 2017 Huffington Post article, Dr. Sudip Bose said, “One thing is certain about the future of Obamacare, and that is that it will change under a Donald Trump presidency.“ Given his public statements, Trump will clearly make sweeping changes sooner than later, but what those changes will be is anything but clear. That’s why today’s article describes what I hope for, if not what I expect.

The US healthcare system has cancer – a malignant form that started way before Obama became President, and it has taken decades to grow to its current condition, where our very existence is threatened. It’s my hope (remember Hope & Change?) that healthcare reform under Trump will not just treat the symptoms of a growing healthcare cancer, like the lack of insurance competition or price transparency. I hope Trump will recognize the need to treat our healthcare system’s cancer aggressively, naturally and holistically. Will he? Read More …

Universal Healthcare Opposition

Obamacare Protest Sign shows Universal Healthcare OppositionWhat is REALLY behind universal healthcare opposition? It’s the fear of helping “LOSERS”

I felt compelled to comment on this article in MedCity News. The article said FEAR was a dominant reason some Americans find it so hard to support the kind of universal healthcare that all other advanced nations have. The dark side of this belief is that “Nobody wants to pay for FREE healthcare for anyone who doesn’t work hard enough, doesn’t have enough determination, or is a Loser” and doesn’t deserve it. The US stands out in this regard, since we are the ONLY one among the 33 advanced nations that does not provide universal healthcare.

While these other countries see healthcare as a basic right and thus a social responsibility, in the U.S. it doesn’t seem to matter whether these ‘losers’ are old people or little kids, are people who lost their jobs, are people with serious health problems through no fault of their own, or are people bankrupt by a serious injury. Those who are afraid to help ‘losers’ speak of defunding the government or killing Obamacare, with no apparent concern that the OECD reports that 17% of US households live below the poverty line, or that they can’t afford healthcare and have an average lifespan 20 years less than those in affluent neighborhoods on opposite sides of the same town.  Read More …

Corporate Behavior and Rising Health Care Costs

If healthcare corporations and insurance companies are persons, as the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision says, then what sort of persons are they?

Click the image to watch

As presented in this award-winning documentary, which you can watch below, the operational principles and legal requirement of a corporation to serve shareholder investment interests, give it a highly anti-social “personality.” Corporations are inherently self-interested (profit-driven), making them often amoral, callous and deceitful, even breaching social and legal standards to get their way. And while they can mimic the human qualities of empathy, caring and altruism, corporations don’t suffer from guilt and can’t be jailed. In short, modern corporations behave like a psychopath, and they use their political clout to avoid regulation and reform.

Free-market capitalism is no longer played on a level playing field, even in healthcare, because large corporations unfortunately invest in lawyers and paid lobbyists to gain political influence and craft laws in their favor. They can effectively “buy” elections with unlimited funds directed in secret to political action committees. Read More …