Evaluating Market Research

What factors influence growth projections in market researchHere’s my advice for evaluating market research, as founding editor of Modern Health Talk and someone who has both purchased and written major market research reports.

Market Research can be biased and short-lived, so before you buy any expensive research reports, make sure you get a chance to interview the authors personally so you understand their assumptions, research process, and what shaped their conclusions. Read More …

Big Data Revolutionizing Healthcare

Big Data Revolutionizing Healthcare

Byline article by Jessica Oaks

The healthcare industry has long been a hotbed for technological and pharmaceutical development. Consider the discovery and later development of penicillin in the 1920s and 1930s to fight bacterial infection, or the use of X-ray imaging in the 1890s to see inside the body. Technology furthers the cause of healthcare and medicine by enabling better treatment and better outcomes.

So it should come as no surprise that technology continues to revolutionize the modern healthcare industry. What may surprise you, however, is the role that technology increasingly is playing in healthcare. After years of evolutionary development, in which existing processes and technologies were slightly refined and improved upon, healthcare is truly undergoing something of a seismic shift in the way patient care is approached. Read More …

One Poll surveys 1000 people about Sleep – Interesting

New Survey Explains the Importance of Sleep

By Paula Davis-Laack, Lawyer turned burnout prevention expert

OnePoll Sleep SurveyAre you a sleep worker?

No, not a sleepwalker, but a person who goes to work and attempts to function on too little sleep? It turns out, one-third of American workers are sleep working — not getting enough sleep to function at peak levels, according to researchers at Harvard Medical School.

On the home front, men and women experience interrupted sleep, but often for different reasons. Women are more than twice as likely to interrupt their sleep to care for others, and once they’re up, they are awake longer: 44 minutes, compared with 30 minutes for men.

According to a new sleep survey conducted by One Poll, 1,000 people aged 18 – 55+ were asked a series of questions about their sleep habits. Here are some of the findings: Read More …

Enjoy Aging! And What’s Going On With Your Body

Enjoy Aging!

By Alfred Stallion

Elderly Couple
Aging is a fact of life and part of this is a change in your body’s ability to handle certain tasks, an increase in vulnerability to illness, and a variety of other conditions that can affect your ability to do things that were once straightforward. By understanding the natural changes that occur in your body with age, you can expect them and adjust accordingly, ensuring that you enjoy an active and happy life. Read More …

FUTURE: “Smart Skin” monitors Vital Signs

The following 2011 story of nano-scale technology caught my eye but may need an introduction. It’s about the ability to embed sensors and other electronic components into a flexible film that’s half the thickness of a human hair, can be applied like a temporary tattoo, and is worn with comfort.

Updated Video from November 2015


The “smart skin” can be packed with micro-circuits including sensors, receivers, transmitters, diodes, transistors, antennas, and miniature solar cells. That means there are many potential applications, including:
Read More …

Senior Housing and Care Settings

Should Older Americans Live in Places Segregated From the Young?

by Stephen M Golant, Professor of Geography, University of Florida, republished here with permission

Residents play shuffleboard at Limetree Park in Bonita Springs, Florida. Steve Nesius/Reuters

Demographers frequently remind us that the United States is a rapidly aging country. From 2010 to 2040, we expect that the age-65-and-over population will more than double in size, from about 40 to 82 million. More than one in five residents will be in their later years. Reflecting our higher life expectancy, over 55% of this older group will be at least in their mid-70s.

While these numbers result in lively debates on issues such as social security or health care spending, they less often provoke discussion on where our aging population should live and why their residential choices matter. Read More …

10 Surprising Benefits of House Work

benefits of house work

Getting out the mop and sponge does not qualify as fun for many people, but the benefits extend beyond just getting their houses clean, and in surprising ways.

1. By cleaning the house, you are getting a workout. When you go from not cleaning the house at all to scrubbing it down on a regular basis, you may begin to feel as though you’re losing pounds. While skipping the gym entirely is probably out of the question, you may quickly find that the amount of times you need to go is significantly reduced. You can use that time to clean instead. Read More …

Google expands Health Search feature

People won’t trust Dr. Google if the search results they get are from Joe Blow or who knows who with no assurance of information accuracy, so Google is improving the quality of health information we find online using the company’s its prolific search engine, and this has tremendous potential.

Maybe you just heard a news story about gluten-free diets and then go online to ask, “What is celiac disease?” Or maybe a co-worker shook your hand and later you found out she had pink eye, so you look up “pink eye” to see if it’s contagious and what the symptoms and treatments are. It’s comforting to know that real medical experts have vetted the information presented.

Mobile search example

Starting back in February, when you asked Google about common health conditions, relevant medical facts from reputable sources began to appear, such as this one for tonsillitis. Google Health Info Curated

Google expands Health Search feature

Read More …

Ain’t the way to Die – video

Ain’t the way to Die

After you watch this RAP video by ZDoggMD, read Zen and the Art of Dying Well, a New York Times editorial.

What is the ‘right’ way to die? We’re experiencing a zeitgeist moment about that. ‘Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End,’ by Atul Gawande, is a best-selling book. Videos by Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old who wanted to die in a way of her own choosing, went viral last year. And in more than 20 countries, thousands of people have dined and discussed dying through a project called Death Over Dinner.

Read More …

When I was born, or when you were

Roy Rogers

Certain pivotal events cause us to reflect on the past or envision the future. New Year’s day is one such event; birthdays are another. Since my birthday is tomorrow, so I thought it might be fun to see if you could guess when I was born, based on interesting tidbits I found online. After all, this site already has over 100 articles on the Future and several more on preserving your digital Legacy. Isn’t it time to just look back and see how much change has occurred in our lifetimes? Read More …

About this Blog

This blog features byline and original articles, but much more of my work is available by following my social media accounts. That’s where I point to important 3rd party articles I find elsewhere, often with my knowledge and insight added in comments. This is what I do every morning:
Read More …

How to Manage Arthritis Pain

Arthritis Pain

5 All-Natural & Effective Ways to Manage Arthritis Pain

If getting out of bed in the morning is difficult due to a chronically sore back or knees, or your hands or ankles ache throughout the day, you may be among the 52.5 million adults in the United States that the CDC estimates have some form of arthritis.

While many people who suffer from osteoarthritis are prescribed pain medication by their physicians, some may wish to find alternative ways of dealing with their discomfort.

Fortunately, there are a variety of natural and simple ways that can help people manage their arthritis pain. Read More …

Wealth Inequality, Healthcare and the Economy

A Washington Post article last week concluded that People have no idea what inequality actually looks like, and that caused me to respond and to enhance this article, which was published here two years ago. It features some disturbing videos that help us understand the corrupting influence of big money in politics and the direct relationships between:

  • Special interest lobbying and policies resulting in a widening of income & wealth gaps,
  • Between the widening wealth gaps and poverty,
  • Between Poverty and obesity,
  • Between obesity and diabetes and other chronic illness,
  • Between chronic illness and rising healthcare costs, and
  • Between rising healthcare costs and our economic problems.

Read More …

Understanding Back Pain

Lower Back Pain

Source: Synergy Health Clinic

Understanding Back Pain

By Dale Powell

It’s a real pain in the… well back I suppose. Do you ask yourself, “Why me?” Well it might be comforting news for you that lower back pain is a very common issue as 80% of people will suffer its wrath at some time in their life.

While you can have back pain at any age, it’s said that people between the ages of 35 and 65 are to occur and suffer lower back pain more than any other age groups. No matter what age you are, lower back pain can strike, often based on your lifestyle and daily habits. Read More …

The End of Moore’s Law? Don’t Bet on it.

Digital MindIn Moore’s Law and The Future of Health Care, I offer a vision of healthcare based on exponential advancements in tech innovation as described by Gordon Moore. Moore is an Intel cofounder and is credited with observing that computer circuits have shrunk in size and doubling in compute capacity every two years. Moore’s Law is what drives down costs & size, but that logarithmic trend is not easy to grasp. So let’s look at two analogies explaining a 60,000 improvement in cost and 90,000 improvement in speed since Intel started tracking computer chips in the 1960’s.

COST — If the price of cars and gas improved exponentially at the same rate as computer chips, we’d be able to buy a new car for about 8-cents today and would only spend 2-cents per year on gas. At that rate, cars would be disposable, and we might just buy a new one for each trip, as a fashion accessory matched to our outfit.

SPEED — If the speed of air travel advanced at the same exponential rate as computing, today we’d be able to fly from the U.S. to Japan in less than a second, but the plane would be just over 1-tenth of an inch long.

Industry analysts keep predicting the end of Moore’s Law, arguing for many reasons that computer chips can only get so small or so cheap, and today I responded to another article about The End of Moore’s Law. Here’s my response, which shows optimism from my 30 years at IBM (I retired in 1999) and my interest in technology as a futurist. Read More …

Trust the Internet or Your Doctor?

Doctors were once the most trusted members of the community, but now it’s the opposite. Why are we so desperate for our doctors to be wrong? I don’t get it.

That was the beginning of an editorial in The Daily Beast that made my hair stand on end. The undisclosed doctor/author did a fine job of writing and defending his profession, but I found it obvious that he/she still doesn’t understand why so many people distrust their doctor. The rest of this is from the two comments I posted, along with links to related articles.

TIME magazine cover

COMMENT-1:

No, you don’t get it. Your sarcastic editorial, although interesting and well-organized, misses the point entirely. Americans pay twice as much on healthcare as other nations but still live sicker and die younger, according to the World Health Organization. Why is that? It’s certainly not because we now trust the Internet more than our doctor. It must be something else, and Steven Brill got closest to describing the problem in his TIME Magazine report, “Bitter Pill: Why High Medical Bills Are Killing Us.”

How has the Internet become a more trusted source of medical information than the family doctor? Maybe it has to do with the natural incentives of an industry that profits from illness and injury and spends twice as much on political lobbying as the military industrial complex to protect its obscene profits. Read More …

On Legacy Writing & The Gift of Remembering

memory tattooby: Jess Hagemann

Everyone has a story to share; not just presidents and kings. Preserving your memories is a gift to yourself and everyone who knows you, a gift to which I can personally testify. — Jess

EDITOR: I urge you to read this article and preserve your story while you can, because it will mean a lot to your family after you’re gone. This article reminds me of the memories my mom left in a hand-written book, Grandma was Quite a Girl.” And it reminds me to mention other articles on this site about preserving your legacy.

Why One Man Tattooed His Memories on His Body.

When director Christopher Nolan released Memento in 2000, the National Institute of Mental Health hailed the film as “a perfect exploration of the neurobiology of memory.” In Memento, protagonist Leonard Shelby suffers from anterograde amnesia, or the inability to create new memories following a trauma. (That is, Leonard’s short-term memory is completely shot, while his long-term memory remains intact). To make up for the fact that he can no longer mentally record the day-to-day events of his life, Leonard begins tattooing ‘clues’ onto his body at the end of each day, so that when he wakes in the morning the tattoos might trigger or reinform his daily experiences. Tattoos! A permanent, physical manipulation of the human body, just to remember something—that’s how urgently important memories are to the human race! Read More …