Care Facilities | Agencies

Meaning And Depth of the Primary Care Crisis

photo image of Stephen C. Schimpff, MDThis is Part 1 of a Series on The Crisis in Primary Care by Stephen C Schimpff, MD

The primary care physician (PCP) should be the backbone of the American healthcare system. But primary care is in crisis – a very serious crisis.

The first statement is my considered opinion and I will attempt to convince you of its truth. The second sentence is a simple fact.

Accounting for only 5% of all health care expenses, the PCP can largely control the “if and when” of the other 95% and hence can be the one to best affect quality of care and the totality of costs. This crisis limits the effectiveness of the primary care physician such that care quality is nowhere near what it could be or should be and the costs of care have skyrocketed. Read the rest of this entry »

Medical Tourism is a Growing Trend

Medical TourismToday’s short post features my response to a Forbes article by Dr. Robert Pearl, Offshoring American Health Care: Higher Quality At Lower Costs?, about the Cayman Islands, which are known for inviting coral-sand beaches, laid-back island culture and tax-free status.

Medical Tourism is a growing trend

This trend is not just in the Cayman Islands. Over 8 million people worldwide, and 1.3 million Americans, cross international borders for better and cheaper care. That trend will increase as insurers offer low-cost policies with high deductibles that encourage consumers to seek the best value in health care and lifestyle decisions. Read the rest of this entry »

Technology and the Senior Housing Industry

Is Technology Disrupting or Transforming the Senior Housing Industry?

Visiting GrandmaThis is the question posed by Joseph F Coughlin, Director of the MIT AgeLab, in his article, which is reproduced below with his permission.

The disruptive demographics of an aging society offers a growth opportunity for the senior housing industry. However, technology is also presenting new ways to enable older adults to stay in their own homes rather than move into senior housing options. Yet many of these same technologies, creatively applied, may improve the attractiveness and operational efficiency of senior housing. So is technology a threat or an opportunity for the senior housing industry? The answer is – yes. Read the rest of this entry »

The Retirement Home Option

Two old womenGuest article by Gina Cook

Everyone knows that the senior population is growing fast.  By 2051 one in four people in the population is likely to be a senior over the age of 65.  Yes, this will put a strain on our healthcare system, but this has been known for years yet what has been done to prepare?  Very little!

Working in a retirement home in Scarborough, Ontario, I see this every day.  On a daily basis we get phone calls from social workers and families saying that they need immediate care for a senior.  We spend a great deal of time educating families who are told that their loved one is ready for discharge from hospital and they don’t know where to turn.  They end up at our home often with very little information and are distressed, confused and frankly without being given the information they need to make an informed decision. Read the rest of this entry »

The Patient-Centered Medical Home, an Interview

The PCMH and Home Care Data: An Interview with Melissa McCormack is a byline article by Melody Wilding

PCMH LogoThe Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Model is a new approach which seeks to enhance care coordination and community-based care.

To learn more about how health care data fits into the PCMH model and how the new approach will helps seniors, we spoke with PCMH specialist Melissa McCormack of Software Advice, a source for medical systems reviews.

How does home care fit into the PCMH model? 

The PCMH model is all about putting the patient at the center of care. Under traditional fee-for-service models, doctors have no incentive to follow their patient’s health outside of the office, because they receive no compensation for doing so. But the PCMH model rewards doctors for keeping their patients healthy, which incentivizes them to monitor their patients’ health not just in the office, but at home, too.

Read the rest of this entry »

The $49 Doctor Visit, Online

Doctor Visit

Oh, the indignity of it all.

Instead of searching for a doctor, calling for an appointment, taking time off work, and then driving to the doctor’s office, just connect online with video.

Healthcare just got a whole lot easier for consumers, thanks to American Well and a new telehealth service that connects people to physicians through their iPad, iPhone or Android device as well as any web browser.

The company’s technology manages physician availability and allows consumers to either choose a specific doctor or simply connect to the next available one. They can also review doctors’ professional profiles and see how other patients rate them.

Doctors accessed via American Well are currently available for live video consults 24 x 7 x 365 in 44 states and the District of Columbia. The $49 cost of a 10-minute video call can be paid via credit card, debit card or health savings account, and at that rate it costs less than a typical office visit, which averages $68 and can reach up to $120 Read the rest of this entry »

Middle Generation: Rising Cost of Care for America’s Elderly

Middle Generation LadiesBy Caroline Montague

With an aging population and a generation of young adults struggling to achieve financial independence, the burdens and responsibilities of middle-aged Americans are increasing. Nearly half (47 percent) of these adults have a parent age 65 or older and are either raising a young child or financially supporting a grown child (age 18 or older). In addition, about one in seven middle-aged adults (15 percent) are providing financial support to both an aging parent and a child.

Adult children, worried about costs and the loss of their parents’ independence, must make difficult decisions about the best options for care for their loved ones. Assisted living communities, such as Emeritus assisted living, allow individuals to remain independent as long as possible in an environment that maximizes the person’s autonomy, dignity, privacy and safety. These types of communities also encourage family and resident involvement. (Editor: Emeritus is one of the largest and most well known, but you can also compare facilities in your area by zip code.)  Read the rest of this entry »

Long-term Care – 11 Myths and Facts

Long-term Care Myths & FactsMost people over 65 will need some kind of help with the activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, or moving around. The need for such help can stem from a chronic illness or the natural decline of eyesight, hearing, strength, balance, and mobility that comes with aging. It’s never too early, or too late, to start planning for long-term care.

Many people think the phrase “long-term care” refers to an insurance policy. While insurance may be part of your strategy, long-term care encompasses many other decisions. You will need to decide where you will live, how you will navigate the myriad of legal, family, and social dynamics along the way, and the many options for paying for everyday help. Though a number of government programs may help pay for some long-term care services, many people are faced with significant out-of-pocket costs.

In partnership with LongTermCare.gov, Huffington Post took a look at eleven myths that may be keeping some from planning for long-term care, and ways you and your loved ones can prepare for the future.

Myth 1: I won’t need it

About 70 percent of Americans over 65 will need some kind of help with the activities of daily living for months or years as they age. It may be due to an illness, chronic disease, or disability. But often, the care is required because of the natural decline due to aging of one’s eyesight, hearing, strength, balance, or mobility. Read the rest of this entry »

Secret Hospital Charges Now Revealed, Wide Disparities

High Healthcare CostsHospital Prices No Longer Secret As New Data Reveals Bewildering System, Staggering Cost Differences

By Jeffrey Young and Chris Kirkham

When a patient arrives at Bayonne Hospital Center in New Jersey requiring treatment for the respiratory ailment known as COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, she faces an official price tag of $99,690.

Less than 30 miles away in the Bronx, N.Y., the Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center charges only $7,044 for the same treatment, according to a massive federal database of national health care costs made public on Wednesday. Read the rest of this entry »

CES 2013 prominently features HealthSpot Station

“Real doctors. Real medicine. Really convenient.”

HealthSpot Station was prominently featured in the central lobby just as you entered the Las Vegas Convention Center during CES 2013, an honor that only the most interesting companies get.

Doctors and patients meet face-to-face like they always have, only in this case, the face-to-face is virtual: the doctor is in his home or office; the patient is seated in the kiosk; and the kiosk is located in a retail store. The HealthSpot Station kiosk allows board-certified doctors to conduct remote diagnosis and treatment using high-def videoconferencing and digital medical devices that appear behind locked doors when needed.

Read the rest of this entry »

Follow Us
 Follow @mHealthTalk on Twitter. Follow us (and Like us) on Facebook.” width= Subscribe to our Weekly Email Newsletter.” width= mHealthTalk pin boards on Pinterest.” width= Add us to your circles on Google+.” width= mHealthTalk channel.” width=
Article Categories
Partners & Awards
@mhealthtalk Recent Tweets