Insurance|Medicare|Medicaid

As Boomers Age, Who Will Care for Seniors?

the romanian mob

Photo by Flickr user jonrawlinson

Guest article by Albert Lester (editor enhanced)

Americans keep living longer. According to the CIA World Factbook, 26% of Americans are older than 55. Just more than 40% fall in the 25-54 age range, double the rate for those under age 14, and dwarfing the number of 15-24 year olds. Moreover, our population growth is less than one percent. For baby boomers, some of whom have already entered retirement, this brings an interesting question: will there be enough entitlement funds to help support them in old age, and will there be enough caregivers in the smaller generation groups that follow them to meet the demand? Read the rest of this entry »

Middle Generation: Rising Cost of Care for America’s Elderly

Middle Generation LadiesBy Caroline Montague

With an aging population and a generation of young adults struggling to achieve financial independence, the burdens and responsibilities of middle-aged Americans are increasing. Nearly half (47 percent) of these adults have a parent age 65 or older and are either raising a young child or financially supporting a grown child (age 18 or older). In addition, about one in seven middle-aged adults (15 percent) are providing financial support to both an aging parent and a child.

Adult children, worried about costs and the loss of their parents’ independence, must make difficult decisions about the best options for care for their loved ones. Assisted living communities, such as Emeritus assisted living, allow individuals to remain independent as long as possible in an environment that maximizes the person’s autonomy, dignity, privacy and safety. These types of communities also encourage family and resident involvement. (Editor: Emeritus is one of the largest and most well known, but you can also compare facilities in your area by zip code.)  Read the rest of this entry »

Understanding Confusing Medical Bills for Seniors

Senior couple studying Confusing Medical BillsThe rising cost of medical bills is a concerning issue, particularly if you are retired and are facing health challenges. As the cost of medical procedures increases, a large number of American adults are filing for bankruptcy. The high cost is expected to cause 1.7 million individuals and families to file for bankruptcy, reported Today.com. Although the numbers are troubling, it does not mean you do not have options to help improve your personal situation.

Check For Obvious Errors

Before you assume that the price given on your medical bill is accurate, read through the details and check it for accuracy. Roughly 80 percent of medical bills have an error, according to Mint.com. The errors can come from simple mistakes in inputting data, coding errors or bugs in the system. Read the rest of this entry »

OBAMACARE – a moving infographic

Obamacare does so many things to give people better access to affordable, quality health care. The folks at Colorado Consumer Health Initiative just like to say THANKS OBAMACARE with this moving infographic about President Obama’s healthcare plan and how it actually helps people. Nothing is perfect, but we think there are a lot of positives that came out of this whole thing, and politicians focus only on negative talking points. ugh.

Tips to Beat Out Health Insurance

InsuranceBy D.Smith

Paying health insurance can be a big financial burden. However, it is something that you need to have if you want help with the cost of medical procedures. Although it may not pay for everything, it can help to spread the cost of health care. It can seem like a lot of money disappearing each month, but you have to consider that it will cover the health costs for you and your family. There are some things that you can do though, to bring the cost down or make sure that it stays lower for longer as you age. Read the rest of this entry »

Long-term Care – 11 Myths and Facts

Long-term Care Myths & FactsMost people over 65 will need some kind of help with the activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, or moving around. The need for such help can stem from a chronic illness or the natural decline of eyesight, hearing, strength, balance, and mobility that comes with aging. It’s never too early, or too late, to start planning for long-term care.

Many people think the phrase “long-term care” refers to an insurance policy. While insurance may be part of your strategy, long-term care encompasses many other decisions. You will need to decide where you will live, how you will navigate the myriad of legal, family, and social dynamics along the way, and the many options for paying for everyday help. Though a number of government programs may help pay for some long-term care services, many people are faced with significant out-of-pocket costs.

In partnership with LongTermCare.gov, Huffington Post took a look at eleven myths that may be keeping some from planning for long-term care, and ways you and your loved ones can prepare for the future.

Myth 1: I won’t need it

About 70 percent of Americans over 65 will need some kind of help with the activities of daily living for months or years as they age. It may be due to an illness, chronic disease, or disability. But often, the care is required because of the natural decline due to aging of one’s eyesight, hearing, strength, balance, or mobility. Read the rest of this entry »

Affordable Care Act tests home care for Medicare patients

Health care reform law aims to improve care,
lower costs for seniors and people with disabilities.

House Call

The Problem

3-4 million seniors living with multiple chronic illnesses such as diabetes, lung and heart disease are too ill or disabled to easily visit their physician when they need care. Instead, they go to the ER or are hospitalized. These seniors represent about 10% of Medicare beneficiaries but account for two thirds of Medicare’s expenditures, and it’s a problem that’s not going away. The number of people with multiple chronic illnesses will grow to 6-8 million by 2025.

The Solution

House calls, directed at these highest cost patients first, are a solution to the rising Medicare costs. The average $1,500 per ER visit, for example, can more than justify the cost of 10 house calls. Savings are even greater for avoided hospitalizations. Home-based primary care programs have the potential to save 20-40% on Medicare’s most expensive patients by bringing them care in their homes. But this is a new and relatively unproven healthcare delivery model.

Testing the Solution

The Independence at Home Demonstration, authorized by the Affordable Care Act, will test the viability of a new service delivery model that utilizes physician and nurse practitioner directed primary care teams to provide services to certain Medicare beneficiaries in their homes. Up to 10,000 Medicare patients with chronic conditions will now be able to get most of the care they need at home.

“This program gives new life to the old practice of house calls, but with 21st Century technology and a team approach,” said Marilyn Tavenner, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Acting Administrator.

The new Independence at Home Demonstration greatly expands the scope of in-home services Medicare beneficiaries can receive. It’s a voluntary program for chronically ill Medicare beneficiaries that will provide them with a complete range of primary care services.  Read the rest of this entry »

What is a Fair Price for your health care needs?

Hospital Charges can vary widelyAccording to a new report from the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, there are vast differences in how much you will pay depending on which hospital you use. Where one might charge $7,000 for a procedure, another just down the road may charge $100,000 or more for the same care quality. (see Secret Hospital Charges)

Now there are ways to find the Fair Price on your own. One is like the Kelly Blue Book of healthcare, and it’s appropriately called Healthcare Blue Book. If you’re dealing with some major healthcare procedures, it’s certainly worth checking out. It never hurts to get informed when it comes to dealing with health care providers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Obamacare: What’s at Stake if it’s Repealed

Obamacare Pre-existing ConditionsBy Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services

More than three years ago, Congress passed the Affordable Care Act and President Obama signed it into law. Last year, the Supreme Court upheld it. Millions of Americans have already benefited from its provisions, and millions more are looking forward to benefits that will soon go into effect. And in November, the American people re-elected the president as an affirmation of the law’s promise that no person should go broke if they get sick.

Yet today, for nearly the 40th time since it’s been the law of the land, House Republicans staged yet another repeal vote in their latest attempt to turn back the clock on progress and deny Americans health insurance coverage they can count on.

For the 37th time, Congress is voting to repeal the health care law, the Affordable Care Act.
Learn what’s at stake for Americans if the law were repealed.

Read the rest of this entry »

Nine States Deny The Poor Health Care

GOP Governors Deny The Poor Health Care
In Opposing Obamacare’s Medicaid Expansion

 

Where states stand on the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)

By Peter S. Goodman and Jeffrey Young

RUSTON, La. — With no health insurance and not enough money for a doctor, Laura Johnson is long accustomed to treating her ailments with a self-written prescription: home remedies, prayer and denial.

Read the rest of this entry »

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