Disrupting Healthcare with Functional Medicine 2.0

Disrupting Healthcare with Functional Medicine 2.0

By Dr. Shaiv Kapadia, Chief Medical Officer and Co-Founder, Iggbo

The United States has the best and worst healthcare system in the world. Let me explain. If you are having a heart attack or stroke or a victim of an accident, there is no better integrated system of acute care delivery on the planet. Chronic disease, however, is a completely different story. [EDITOR: The medical industrial complex spends twice as much on political lobbying as the military industrial complex, to avoid disrupting healthcare as they know it. That’s because cutting costs to match what other advanced nations pay per capita would mean losing over $1.5 trillion/year in profits – profits that today mostly come from treating symptoms.] Read More …

‘The Patient Will See You Now’ Envisions New Era

The Patient Will See You Now (book)The Patient Will See You Now’ is a book by Dr. Eric Topol that envisions a New Era in healthcare where we consumers take more responsibility for our own health and wellness and have the tools to do so. Often these are smaller, cheaper, and easier to use versions of what doctors have used for years, but digital and in some cases more accurate or beneficial.

Dr. Abigail Zuger wrote a review of Topol’s book for The New York Times and described the overall thesis as “the old days of ‘doctor knows best’ are as good as gone. No longer will doctors control medical data, treatment or profits. Instead, thanks to the newest science, humanity will finally achieve truly democratic health care: Up with patients! ‘Our Bodies, Our Selves’ for all!”

As Tool says in the following video, “What bothers me most about healthcare is the unwillingness to give rightful info to patients.”

Read More …

Senior Housing and Care Settings

Should Older Americans Live in Places Segregated From the Young?

by Stephen M Golant, Professor of Geography, University of Florida, republished here with permission

Residents play shuffleboard at Limetree Park in Bonita Springs, Florida. Steve Nesius/Reuters

Demographers frequently remind us that the United States is a rapidly aging country. From 2010 to 2040, we expect that the age-65-and-over population will more than double in size, from about 40 to 82 million. More than one in five residents will be in their later years. Reflecting our higher life expectancy, over 55% of this older group will be at least in their mid-70s.

While these numbers result in lively debates on issues such as social security or health care spending, they less often provoke discussion on where our aging population should live and why their residential choices matter. Read More …

Fixing the Primary Care Crisis

Available in print form on Amazon.com for $14.95As I keep reminding people, Americans spend twice as much as other countries on health care yet still live sicker and die younger, according to the World Health Organization. At $3 trillion/year, that’s about 18% of the nation’s GDP, and it’s not sustainable, especially as our nation’s baby boomers approach retirement age and start needing more medical care in their later years.

I’ve known Dr. Stephen C Schimpff (electronically) for years and have published several of his articles here on mHealthTalk. I’m happy today to promote his controversial new book, Fixing The Primary Care Crisis: Reclaiming the Patient-Doctor Relationship and Returning Healthcare Decisions to You and Your Doctor. ($3.95 for the e-book and $14.95 for the print edition)

Dr. Schimpff begins his book with an overview of what primary care is and is not, why it’s in crisis, and why the American medical care delivery system is so badly dysfunctional. He then explores the concepts of integrative medicine, trust and the all-important issue of healing. Read More …

BRAINCHANGE with David Perlmutter M.D.

BRAINCHANGEOur local PBS channel (KLRU.org) today aired BRAINCHANGE, a special on Alzheimer’s Prevention that featured Dr. David Perlmutter, M.D.

Perlmutter is a board-certified neurologist who gained much of his knowledge about brain science from his dad, who was a practicing neurosurgeon and now has Alzheimer’s. That experience gave him even more motivation to understand why Americans have such a high rate of Alzheimer’s and why that is increasing.

The special served as a PBS fund-raiser but in many ways seemed like an infomercial to sell Perlmutter’s book, Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar–Your Brain’s Silent Killers. Still, it was factual, thought-provoking, and complements work I’m involved with at Intelligent Sleep, where we see sleep as the third leg of wellness and as important as nutrition and exercise. I could not find an online version of the show, but here are my notes and some summary videos: Read More …

Doctored, about Physician Disillusionment

Doctored - The Disillusionment of an American Physician

Click to buy on Amazon.com

Doctors are just as frustrated with our fee-for-service “sick care” system as patients are. Following on the heels of a related article from a few days ago by Dr. Stephen Schimpff, today’s post introduces an NPR article featuring an in-depth interview with cardiologist Sandeep Jauhar, MD, who wrote the book, Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician. It begins…

“As a young doctor working at a teaching hospital, Sandeep Jauhar was having trouble making ends meet. So, like other academic physicians, he took a job moonlighting at a private practice, the offices of a cardiologist. He noticed that the offices were quick to order expensive tests for their patients — even when they seemed unnecessary. It was ‘made very clear from the beginning’ that seeing patients alone was not financially rewarding for the business.”

Read the rest at NPR, listen to the full interview below,
or watch the Wall Street Journal interview below that. Read More …

101 MiniTrends in Health Care

Watch for Trends Ahead

This image is from MiniTrends, a book by John Vanston that I strongly endorse. I’ve known John for years and did consulting work for his company, Technology Futures. His book inspired my Modern Health Talk vision. (Click image to see book. Go to end to hear about the MiniTrends conference.)

“What the Hell is happening to health care?”

“And is it an Opportunity or a Threat?”

Insights by Wayne Caswell, Founder of Modern Health Talk.

An awful lot has changed in just the last few years and even more will change in the near future, with the aim of reducing (or at least containing) our health care costs. What’s behind these MiniTrends, and what is their implication for providers, payers and consumers? That’s the $1.5 trillion question. Here I talk about many, many MiniTrends–surely you can find 101 of them if you look! 

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.” – Charles Darwin

That quote is important, because 429 of the original Fortune 500 companies [1955] are no longer in business today. That’s a scary thought for those sitting at the top of the healthcare mountain, because they know they must adapt to the megatrend of health reform and Obamacare (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) or die. And they are looking down with fear at the hungry competitors who are already exploiting the many related minitrends, because for them these are times of great opportunity.

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Reframing the Question of Doctor Frustration

Frustrated DoctorBy Dr. Stephen Schimpff

Editor: I just love this doctor’s thinking and have published several of his articles here. I’m happy to feature another one from HealthWorksCollective.

There has been a lot of interest in the Daily Beast article written by Dr Daniela Drake, about very frustrated primary care physicians (PCP.) She quoted both Dr Kevin Pho and myself. Dr Drake noted that nine of 10 doctors would not recommend medicine to their children as a career and that 300 physicians commit suicide each year. “Simply put, being a doctor has become a miserable and humiliating undertaking.”  Dr Pho offered his own commentary here pointing out that “it is important to have the discussion on physician dissatisfaction….demoralized doctors are in no position to care for patients…To be sure many people with good intentions are working toward solving the healthcare crisis. But the answers they’ve come up with are driving up costs and driving out doctors.” Read More …

Disease Delusion: What Really Makes You Sick!

The Disease Delusion, by Dr. Jeffrey Bland

Available at leading book stores.

by Mark Hyman, MD
(from his Forward to The Disease Delusion, by Dr. Jeffrey Bland)

Imagine a time when people died or suffered from incurable acute infections. Imagine a time before antibiotics — when women died of simple childbirth fever, when a bad chest infection could lead to death, when a strep throat caused heart failure, when limbs were amputated because of an infected wound. Those commonplace occurrences seem unimaginable now.

Yet that is the exactly the state of medicine today as we face the tsunami of lifestyle-related chronic diseases that will cost our global economy $47 trillion over the next twenty years. These diseases are eminently preventable and treatable, and yet currently, every year, they kill twice as many people around the world as infectious diseases do. Read More …

Independent for Life

Book cover: Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

order online at University of Texas Press

 

From INDEPENDENT FOR LIFE: HOMES AND NEIGHBORHOODS FOR AN AGING AMERICA
edited by Henry Cisneros, Margaret Dyer-Chamberlain, and Jane Hickie, forward by John W. Rowe,
Copyright © 2012. Courtesy of the University of Texas Press.

 

Do you want to age independently in your own home and neighborhood? Staying home, aging in place, is most people’s preference, but most American housing and communities are not adapted to the needs of older people. And with the fastest population growth among people over 65, finding solutions for successful aging is important not only for individual families, but for our whole society. In Independent for Life, former HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros and a team of experts on aging, architecture, construction, health, finance, and politics assess the current state of housing and present new possibilities that realistically address the interrelated issues of housing, communities, services, and financial concerns.

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Medicine Unplugged: Your phone, DNA and data

Medicine Unplugged: Your phone, your DNA, your dataBy Eric J. Topol, M.D. (original article on Huffington Post)

Just as the little mobile wireless devices radically transformed our day-to-day lives, so will such devices have a seismic impact on the future of health care. It’s already taking off at a pace that parallels the explosion of another unanticipated digital force — social networks. Read More …

How Universal Design is influencing Architecture

Could Universal Design Be the Next Mainstream Movement in Architecture, Planning?

Click on book image, Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments, to learn more at Amazon.comNew textbook provides the first comprehensive introduction to a growing field

Release Date: April 20, 2012

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Universal design, which employs design to encourage health and wellness and other quality-of-life improvements, may be poised to become the next mainstream endeavor in architecture and planning, according to two leading experts in the field.  (I hope they’re right. – Wayne)

Edward Steinfeld, director of the University at Buffalo’s Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center), and Jordana L. Maisel, the center’s director of outreach and policy studies, are authors of a new textbook, “Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments.”

“We believe we are close to a watershed moment,” the authors write in the preface to the book, which was released on April 10 and includes chapters on housing, interior design, transportation and more. “Whether they know the term or not, the work of leading architects and design firms reflects the adoption of universal design concepts.” Read More …

The End of Illness

The End of Illness - image from Amazon.comToday’s article is adapted from The End of Illness by Dr. David B. Agus and an ABC News story about his book. (video below)

“The end of illness is closer than you might think,” says Agus, a professor of medicine at USC. But to achieve that, people must look at their bodies in a whole new way. He and many others like him are challenging long-held beliefs about what “health” means and are promoting health & wellness as ways to extend life, improve vitality, and lower the cost of medical care.

As a cancer doctor and researcher on the front lines, Dr. Agus became infuriated by the statistics and lack of progress within the medical profession, and that got him thinking about alternative approaches. He likens it to “having to go to war to understand peace,” since the goal should be to avoid war in the first place. And shouldn’t the same apply to health – striving for ways to eliminate illness rather than just treat its symptoms? Read More …

The Future of Health Care Delivery

book cover - The Future of Health Care DeliveryAuthor’s summary by Stephen C Schimpff, MD

Health Care in the United States is a paradox.  We are the most abundant, highly advanced market in the world, where research, commitment of providers, and dollars spent are unmatched.  And yet… medical care is not uniformly available, is much too expensive and the quality of care is all too often less than satisfactory and not nearly safe enough. It is time for a different approach. .

There are many disruptive, often transformational changes coming, which will further complicate matters for the average patient.  These changes are being driven by an aging population, our adverse lifestyles and behaviors, an increasing shortage of providers, our attitudes about the end of life, and a nascent rise in consumerism.

One of the most important changes  is a shift from acute illness (e.g. pneumonia, appendicitis) to chronic diseases (e.g.,  diabetes with complications, heart failure and cancer) which are lifelong once developed, difficult to manage and very expensive to treat – yet mostly preventable.

There are also many misconceptions about what medical care delivery is and what it could and should be. For example, Read More …

Tools & Gadgets for Independent Living

The Illustrated Guide to Assistive Technology: Tools & Gadgets for Living Independently

Using a “lively narrative style,” Suzanne introduces readers to new and existing technologies, where to find them, and how to pay for them.

“The Illustrated Guide to Assistive Technology and Devices” by Suzanne Robitaille reached #1 on Amazon’s Assistive Technology List, and I’m happy to republish this excerpt with her permission. This book has been universally praised since it cuts through the clutter surrounding assistive devices with a simple conversational style. It’s organized according to disability and easily explains the best type of device for a multiple situations, home, work, on the road, or at school.

The book “combines research and personal insight to help even the most novice user make better, more informed choices about assistive technology.”
– Frances West, IBM Human Ability and Accessibility Center

Chapter 1

WHAT IS ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY?

Having a disability isn’t easy. Believe me, I know. I have had a hearing disability since I was four years old. Growing up profoundly deaf impacted my education, my lifestyle, and eventually my employment. Indirectly, it affected my parents, my sister, my teachers, my friends, and my bosses.

But being deaf was also a blessing. It helped me build character; it gave me insight into a more realistic world than the one in which my peers lived; and it brought for me a love of books, and of writing, which my wonderful mother–who, like the rest of my family, was hearing– encouraged me to pursue as a career.

Read More …