The Aging World – Infographic about global aging

The Aging World - How older generations are affecting countries around the globe

By Matt Zajechowski

During the Middle Ages, English poet Geoffrey Chaucer wrote, “Time and tide wait for no man.” Back then, life expectancy was 45 years old, thanks to disease like the bubonic plague, wars, and low infant mortality rates. With the vast, modern improvements in healthcare, hygiene, and diet, populations today can expect much longer, healthy life spans. But living longer has an impact elsewhere, including on the economy and the division of labor and care. Check out The Aging World infographic below to see where older populations are increasing and how they’re affecting the economy. Read More …

Envisioning the Future of Health Care

Envisioning the Future of Health Care

At the end of each New Year, it seems everyone has a list of top trends, as Dr. Meskó did in The Most Exciting Medical Technologies of 2017.

MORE PREDICTIONS: I too have made predictions (http://www.mhealthtalk.com/101-minitrends-in-health-care/) and often point to the hidden opportunities that lurk at the intersections of MiniTrends. Most futurists miss those if they just extrapolate obvious trends without factoring in the many market accelerators and obstacles that determine how quickly a preferred version of the future appears. Read More …

Smart Home Technologies For Mature Homeowners

New research by The Hartford and The MIT AgeLab reveals their Top 10 Smart Home Technologies For Mature Homeowners (press release below).

They conducted joint research to better understand which smart home technologies may benefit homeowners over the age of 50 and get their perspectives on smart home technology. This research involved an extensive review of new smart home technologies by leading experts in housing, aging, and technology and an online survey of homeowners.

Top 10 Smart Home Technologies

Smart home technologies that may make life easier, help with home
maintenance, and enhance safety and security for homeowners 50+.

Top 10 Smart Home Technologies
Read More …

Evaluating Market Research

What factors influence growth projections in market researchHere’s my advice for evaluating market research, as founding editor of Modern Health Talk and someone who has both purchased and written major market research reports.

Market Research can be biased and short-lived, so before you buy any expensive research reports, make sure you get a chance to interview the authors personally so you understand their assumptions, research process, and what shaped their conclusions. Read More …

Top Technology Innovations All Seniors Should Have

Guest article by Helen SmithReal Seniors over age 75 are less likely to be Silver Surfers than baby boomers who used computers in their jobs.

The number of adults over 60 using the Internet and related devices is continuing to grow, and according to a Pew Research survey, over half of all seniors now use the Internet and have cell phones.

This might lead to us to conclude that seniors are “silver surfers,” ready to embrace tech developments as they arise, and turning to the Internet for everything from their shopping and deliveries to their dating needs. In reality, however, we have a long way to go before this is the case. [See Tech Adoption by Real Seniors, because there’s a big gap between them and boomers?]

Technology has been evolving at such a fast rate that keeping up can feel overwhelming, and this is particularly true for seniors [the real seniors]. They often aren’t nearly as excited about new gadgets and gizmos as their younger and more tech-savvy relatives are.

Technology, however, can be a huge benefit to seniors and help them live happier and more enriching lives. So whether you’re a tech wizard or just interested in making life a bit easier, here are the top innovations that all seniors should have: Read More …

Caregiver Frustration to Fulfillment (Mkt. Research)

Caregiver Frustration Survey Reveals Array of Emotions Caregivers Feel in Their Varied Roles

Emotions and the Caregiving Role

Emotions and the Caregiving Role (from CareGiverSupport.org)

By David Inns, CEO of GreatCall

It’s inevitable: our parents and loved ones will get older. It’s also likely they will need care from us. We know this, yet our role continues to be shockingly difficult. We struggle, in part, because there is no set of Caregiver Rules to read or follow, let alone a map of where to go for resources and support.

A recent study of more than 1,000 family caregivers conducted by the independent research firm Cognise for my active aging technology company GreatCall, shows that nearly one-third struggle in their caregiving role and want tools to help them and their family members.  Read More …

20-20 Vision of Digital Life in 2025

Pew Research Center recently published its vision of Digital Life in 2025, based on predictions from over 1,000 experts who generally said the Internet would become “like electricity” – more deeply embedded in our lives but less visible.

Word Cloud - Pew Research examines Digital Life in 2025

Before I present the top 15 themes from the Pew report, here’s my own Back to the Future vision of technology and and its impact & challenges, based on an article I wrote 11 years ago. It looked back 20 years to George Orwell’s 1984 and then forward 20 to the year 2024, and I present it here because it’s helpful to see a history of where things have come from as you contemplate the future. Futurists, however, will tell you that forecasting is not as simple as just extrapolating trends. Read More …

Boomers and Digital Health

Baby Steps: Will Boomers Buy Into Mobile Health?Born between 1946 and 1964, the baby boomer generation represents a very large market opportunity for digital health stakeholders, including providers, payers, and developers of tech-enabled services and sensor-based gadgets such as mobile apps, activity trackers, wearable patches, and personal health devices.

Issue Brief: Will Boomers Buy Into Mobile Health? was written by Laurie Orlov for the California Healthcare Foundation to look at digital health market opportunities and challenges among this important demographic. The report’s optimism is driven by the immense opportunity to address rising healthcare costs but is guarded by disappointing adoption so far and the need for lifestyle changes among boomers themselves. It concludes:

Baby boomers are poised to bring on a wave of health costs, and inventors are eager to find ways to meet their needs, ultimately averting unneeded medical services and expense. The experts interviewed for this report acknowledged that the fitness wearable market is still in its infancy. It is too early to determine if providers are willing to accommodate data that can now be transmitted to them. Further, smartphone apps to monitor calories and tricorder technologies to measure vital signs produce data that will eventually need to augment established patient data. Electronic Health Records are not yet portable between physicians who are based in separate medical practices. And expansion of access, subsidized cost of insurance, or doctor availability may stymie care of lower income boomers, leaving the ER as their only ready access to care. … Further, there is uncertainty for innovators, providers, and consumers. … Experts acknowledged that part of the dilemma is sorting out useful from useless apps. From the consumer perspective, AARP notes that while health apps can help improve everything from balance to breathing, today’s mobile health world is at the “wild, wild west” stage.

While adoption of digital health technologies depends on function and design factors to meet real needs, it also depends largely on boomer lifestyles. Will they actually use the apps and gadgets consistently and pay attention to the results? Charlotte Yeh of AARP Services summarized the market adoption dilemma, saying “If you think about health outcomes, 20% is genetics, 20% is the health care delivery system [including digital health technologies], and 60% is lifestyle.” I can generally agree with that.

Other works by Laurie Orlov

Sleep Technology use by Seniors

Today’s guest post on Sleep Technology use by seniors is written by Barry Birkett and first appeared in Senior Care Corner.

A Good Night Sleep and Our Seniors:
Can Technology Help Them Meet?

Sleep is important to us at all ages, but to seniors it can be a matter of health and safety.

Yes, safety. Too many of our senior loved ones are injured, some with long-term impacts, by falls that might not have happened if they had been sleeping well.

Getting enough sleep is more than just a matter of not feeling tired.

We have discussed seniors and sleep in a number of articles here at Senior Care Corner®, helping family caregivers to understand and address this important aspect of daily life. If it matters to our senior loved ones, after all, it matters to us.

Technology and sleep is a topic we haven’t addressed, even though we talk often about what tech can mean to seniors and caregivers.

Thanks to a new report from the Consumer Electronics Association and National Sleep Foundation, we have some information to bridge that gap. Read More …

Connected health devices and apps are coming quickly

PRESS RELEASE

Parks Associates research finds over two-thirds of U.S. broadband households use a health app or portal on a monthly basis, including over 80% of those with a head of household ages 18-24. Parks Associates will examine successful strategies to improve consumer healthcare adoption and usage at the firm’s second-annual Connected Health Summit: Engaging Consumers, September 9-10 in San Diego, including the challenges of tying consumer solutions into the broader healthcare ecosystem.

“Connected health devices and apps are starting to open healthcare services to larger populations, but right now, consumers spend less than 1% of their time interacting with the healthcare system through hospitals, clinics, doctors, and health coaches,” said Harry Wang, Director, Health & Mobile Product Research, Parks Associates. Read More …

The 10 Best Cities for Technology-Assisted Living

by Christin Camacho, PR & Content Manager, REDFIN, a next-gen real estate brokerage

The National Conference of State Legislatures and AARP Public Policy Institute report that nearly 90 percent of people over the age of 65 want to stay in their home for as long as possible. [See below for brief summary.] Fortunately, in most cases, they won’t have to move as they age. According to Seniorly, a service that helps people find senior care, the majority of seniors do NOT need to move into a nursing home. They simply need some care equivalent to what they would find in an assisted living community, which includes assistance with daily activities like meals, medication, housekeeping, bathing and transportation.

And these days, there’s an app for that. An elderly woman can take an Uber to her friend’s home, find someone to walk her dog through Rover.com, schedule her lawn to be mowed or her house to be cleaned through Porch, get groceries delivered through Instacart, and schedule a professional caregiver to assist with bathing, meal preparation and other daily living activities through CareLinx. Or, for those seniors who aren’t tech-savvy, friends and family can use these technology-based services to arrange care for them. Read More …

2015 Alzheimer’s Statistics

EDITOR: These stats are from Alzheimers.net, an online community dedicated to education, advocacy and supporting those whose lives have been impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Alzheimers.net was created by people touched by Alzheimer’s to give caregivers, those with Alzheimer’s a place to share our passion for change and a cure for the disease. I added a short section on the impact of sleep duration & quality and a related infographic.

Alzheimer’s Statistics Worldwide

2015 Alzheimer's Statistics

  • Worldwide, nearly 44 million people have Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)
  • Only 1-in-4 people with Alzheimer’s disease have been diagnosed. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)
  • Alzheimer’s and dementia is most common in Western Europe (North America is close behind)
  • Alzheimer’s is least prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)
  • Alzheimer’s and other dementias are the top cause for disabilities in later life. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)

Read More …

64% of Consumers Ready for Telehealth (survey)

As a technologist and founder of Modern Health Talk, I advocate for telehealth, including remote doctor visits by video, but I wondered about how ready consumers are for this vision of the future of healthcare. Well, market research from American Well, a telehealth company, answered that. Here’s a summary of their 2015 Telehealth Consumer Survey. Read More …

Is American Health Care the Best?

“Is American Health Care the Best?” The answer to that question might depend on whom you ask, but by almost all measures we aren’t even close. That was the message of this article on Vox that says people who believe our health system is the best are “measuring it wrong.” Here’s some measures we should be considering, followed by some supporting graphs and videos and my perspective:

  • Costs: America spends vastly more than any other nation, often more than twice as much.
  • Access: Tens of millions of Americans remain uninsured. Even after Obamacare, we’ll be behind.
  • Satisfaction: Patients here are less happy with their system, and nurses & doctors are too.
  • Mistakes: Hospitals are dangerous places, given the number of infections & medical errors there.
  • Outcomes: Americans live sicker & die younger. Longevity is shorter and infant mortality is higher.

Read More …

Sleep Statistics from Sleepless in America

By Wayne Caswell, Intelligent Sleep and founder of Modern Health Talk

This last Sunday, I watched “Sleepless in America,” a 2-hour documentary on the National Geographic channel, and I captured some of its powerful statistics and blended them with my own, forming the basis of today’s article. But first, here’s the 3-min trailer. Additional short video segments are included below, along with a related infographic, and if the full length video gets posted, I’ll include it too.

Sleepless in America – Full Version (1:28:15 min)

Sleep Statistics

How much sleep do we Need?

Read More …

Most Americans Eager to Use Digital Health Tools

Today's Wired Patient - INFOGRAPHIC

Today’s Wired Patient – This infographic from Makovsky Health survey shows that, from online search to wearables, technology is changing patient-focused healthcare every step of the way. [Scroll down for a larger version, or click the image for the full size.]

According to the Fifth Annual “Pulse of Online Health” Survey, 66% of Americans are eager to leverage digital tools to manage personal health.

Today’s Wired Patient – This infographic from Makovsky Health survey shows that, from online search to wearables, technology is changing patient-focused healthcare every step of the way. [Scroll down for a larger version, or click the image for the full size.]

This year’s survey reveals consumer readiness to leverage health apps and wearable devices to improve their personal health, and to disclose online personal health data as a path to improved treatment options, trust and quality of health information were cited as important factors in selecting online health sources.

“Smartphones and wearables are driving a major behavioral shift in consumer health and wellness,” said Gil Bashe, executive vice president, Makovsky Health.

Consumers eager to leverage technology for better health

Top interests when downloading and using mobile health apps reflect proactive desires for informative, functional and interactive programs:

  • Tracking diet/nutrition (47%),
  • Medication reminders (46%),
  • Tracking symptoms (45%), and
  • Tracking physical activity (44%).

Read More …

Patient Attitudes About Doctors and Healthcare

American Health Care is Snake BitPatients don’t like their doctors.
Why is that?

That was the topic of a recent article by Peter Ubel at KevinMD.com that mentioned a New England Journal of Medicine article and included the table below. Ubel explored patient attitudes about doctors and healthcare and the reasons why Americans rate their own doctors high (ranked 3rd worldwide) and rate our healthcare system low (tied for 24th, just ahead of Chili, Bulgaria, Russia & Poland). I responded with this comment…

Yes, consumers see most doctors as compassionate and hard-working, with their hearts in the right place. After all, they got into medicine to help people. But the “system” they work in is preventing them from doing that. Read More …

The Cost of Aging in America

 

Income levels for aging Americans are increasing,
but not as quickly as “The Cost of Aging in America.”

The infographic below was produced by the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. It explores the serious financial burdens faced by aging Americans, their loved ones, and industry — as well as steps our health care system might take to counteract this trend. I gladly feature it today to complement other articles here about health reform, public policy, and the future of healthcare.

Some highlights:

  • The number of seniors 85 and older will triple by 2050, an important statistic because these are people who need the most expensive care.
  • The cost of healthcare in America is already over $3 trillion/year, and that doesn’t even include the roughly $450 billion provided by unpaid family members.
  • Paid caregivers earn just $18-20K per year, and while demand for their services will likely double by 2022, their wages likely won’t increase much.

Read More …