Why Republicans Want to Repeal Obamacare

Robert Reich on Why Republicans want to Repeal Obamacare

Here’s what Reich says about an Obamacare repeal:

  • 32 million people will lose coverage,
  • Tens of thousands of American’s will die as a result,
  • Medicare and Medicaid will be left in worse shape, and
  • The rich will get richer in a massive redistribution of wealth.

Missing from this list, and discussed after the video, is how Republicans can use the repeal to maintain control of Congress, the Presidency and the Supreme Court, even as a demographics shift works against them. Read More …

What to ask Clinton and Trump about Healthcare?

I responded to a Huffington Post article about proposed changes to Medicare and questions that should be asked of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, but I went deeper into the serious healthcare issues, citing an article I posted yesterday about The Ideal Healthcare System. It referenced differences between public and private sector organizations but primarily spoke of the need to better align incentives to the nation’s health goals. Therefore, my questions to Presidential candidates relate to that larger view of health and healthcare.

What to ask Clinton and Trump about Healthcare?

What would YOU ask Clinton and Trump about Healthcare? (please comment below and share with others)

Read More …

Presidential Report on Independence Technology

Independence TechnologyIn an 80-page report issued this week, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), made several recommendations to address America’s aging population with independence technology. They include:

  • mHealth innovation,
  • remote patient monitoring,
  • telehealth expansion and reimbursement,
  • broadband access for seniors,
  • more sophisticated wheelchairs, and even
  • home designs for sustained independence.

What follows is a highlighted extract from the report’s Executive Summary. Read More …

Chipping Away at Healthcare Special Interests Yet?

Is it just “One Step Forward and Two Steps Back?” or is something bigger happening?

Last week I read an excellent article in Huffington Post by Charles Francis, and it inspired today’s post about public interests versus special interests. In this article I’ll reflect on the healthcare progress consumers are making despite politicians working against them. But first, more on the obstacles we face.

Special Interests Pull Puppet Strings

In How Mindfulness Meditation Can Transform Health Care, Charles examines the need to change consumer behavior toward healthier lifestyles, so I thought about the role of incentives and awareness education. I’ve written about that before, but today I’ll take a broader look at the many factors influencing the health and productivity of our nation’s workforce and why I remain guardedly optimistic that we’ll overcome political corruption. Included are links to many related articles and this list of over 130 past articles on healthcare policy. Read More …

The Financial Costs Of Moving Home

The Financial Costs of Moving Home

By JP Adams

Many family caregivers consider moving close to a loved one or parent as they become older. There they can help with cleaning, getting groceries, and driving to doctors’ appointments. Most importantly, this gives them and their loved ones an opportunity to connect.

At the same time, the decision to move home can be challenging. I often hear mixed feelings from families – “I’m not sure if it’s something I want to do,” OR “I want to be with her but I don’t really like the area where she lives.”

One thing is overwhelmingly clear.  Moving home is a significant financial decision. There are costs and benefits.  It’s important to go through each and make a rational decision.  Read More …

Consumers Screwed with Insurance Loopholes

Insurance Loopholes & Master Pricing:
How Surprise Medical Bills Knock Consumers Down

Medical Records (photo courtesy of CX2)

Most of us know which local hospitals and doctors are covered by our insurance providers, but even when we make sure that we only see an in-network physician or surgeon, nearly one-third of privately insured Americans are still hit with higher-than-expected medical bills, often because their in-network hospital brought in or contracted out to an out-of-network service provider. How did we get to the point where so many consumers have so little information about what to expect when their hospital bill arrives? (read full article)

Consumers Screwed with Insurance Loopholes

As explained in this excellent article, even though Obamacare intended to address rising prices by promoting prevention, price transparency, and competition among payers & providers – and there has been progress – the system remains hopelessly complex and in need of serious and more aggressive reform.

I’m more convinced than ever that we need to move toward a single-payer system like Medicare-for-All, modeled after other nations that pay half as much and have better outcomes. Meanwhile there may be a role for the new Consumer Protection Agency, because complexity always allows the greedy to find loopholes and screw consumers, while it makes it more difficult for consumers to protect themselves. But if we rely too much on that, the agency could grow immense.

Most consumers, I think, are willing to assume more personal responsibility and Want to seek the best value in care, but that’s difficult to impossible under America’s current and convoluted Sick Care system, which has perverse incentives to view patients as paying customers and treat their symptoms, thus keeping them coming back, paying.

Republican Alternatives To The Affordable Care Act?

What Would Republicans Do Instead Of The Affordable Care Act?

By John McDonough and Max Fletcher

A new spate of proposals from Republican presidential candidates to repeal and/or replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) raises the important question: Given an unobstructed opportunity, what would Republicans really do with the Affordable Care Act? Would they repeal the law wholly or just in part? With what might they replace it?

Some suggest that Republican Congressional leaders only advance full repeal to placate their Party’s conservative base, knowing well that repeal cannot survive a certain veto while Barack Obama is President. In January 2017, that obstacle will vanish if Republicans control the White House and both branches of the U.S. Congress. What then? Read More of this excellent article at HealthAffairs.org.

How can we make healthcare more productive?

How can we make healthcare more productive? was the topic of a LinkedIn discussion started by Joe Flower, author of the book, “Healthcare Beyond Reform: Doing It Right For Half The Cost.” It generated some lively discussion and prompted me to respond as well.

My response to How can we make healthcare more productive?

MotivationCHANGE THE TERMINOLOGY – America has excellent MEDICAL Care, if you can afford it, but we have a horrible HEALTH Care system and desperately need to focus more on health & wellness. We spend twice as much as other nations but still live sicker and die younger, per the WHO. That means we “should” be able to cut costs in half at least while simultaneously improving care quality, patient satisfaction, worker productivity, and GDP.

START WITH EDUCATION – We now teach new doctors how to diagnose and treat illness & injury, not how to prevent it, and that feeds into our fee-for-service SICK Care system that profits from doing more – more tests, more procedures, more drugs. Little time is spent teaching medical students about public health and the pillars of health (exercise, nutrition & sleep), because that doesn’t fit into our for-profit business models. Read More …

101 MiniTrends in Health Care

Watch for Trends Ahead

This image is from MiniTrends, a book by John Vanston that I strongly endorse. I’ve known John for years and did consulting work for his company, Technology Futures. His book inspired my Modern Health Talk vision. (Click image to see book. Go to end to hear about the MiniTrends conference.)

“What the Hell is happening to health care?”

“And is it an Opportunity or a Threat?”

Insights by Wayne Caswell, Founder of Modern Health Talk.

An awful lot has changed in just the last few years and even more will change in the near future, with the aim of reducing (or at least containing) our health care costs. What’s behind these MiniTrends, and what is their implication for providers, payers and consumers? That’s the $1.5 trillion question. Here I talk about many, many MiniTrends–surely you can find 101 of them if you look! 

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.” – Charles Darwin

That quote is important, because 429 of the original Fortune 500 companies [1955] are no longer in business today. That’s a scary thought for those sitting at the top of the healthcare mountain, because they know they must adapt to the megatrend of health reform and Obamacare (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) or die. And they are looking down with fear at the hungry competitors who are already exploiting the many related minitrends, because for them these are times of great opportunity.

Read More …

Telehealth is Shaping Healthcare for the Better

Game ChangerBy Karen R. Thomas, President of Advanced TeleHealth Solutions

As incredibly innovative and efficient as telehealth is at providing greater access to care for consumers, lowering healthcare costs for both patients and healthcare systems, and improving outcomes, barriers have always existed that hinder the widespread adoption of telehealth. Yet recently, issues such as state requirement hurdles, reimbursement limitations, and a general resistance from physicians to learn and integrate new technologies into their care routines are quickly evaporating in the wake of the overwhelming proof of telemedicine’s many benefits. Read More …

Hyper Growth of Private Insurance Exchanges

Shared with permission from MEDCITY News, by Dan Verel, 7/25/2015

Accenture Figure 1

While much attention has been heaped on the public health insurance exchanges over the year, private health insurance exchanges “are experiencing hyper-growth” and enrollment could exceed that of public exchanges by 2017, “if not sooner,” according to Accenture. Read More …

We Endorse Telehealth Across State Lines

Medicine Unplugged: Your phone, your DNA, your data

By Wayne Caswell

Modern Health Talk strongly endorses telehealth and efforts to break down barriers to wider adoption nationwide. The TELE-MED Act of 2013 (HR 3077) is still not out of committee but is intended to start breaking down barriers related to licensure and payment when medical care is given online across state lines, starting with Medicare providers. Hopefully Congress will pass this bill and then start extending telehealth to all insurance carriers. Read More …

Fee-For-Service is Pervasive yet Perverse

The FFS payment model was created long ago, during a time when physicians treated less-complex problems and offered only a few inexpensive therapeutic interventions. It worked back then but a significant percentage of patients today have multiple chronic conditions. Meanwhile, the number of complex and very expensive tests, medications and interventions available are practically unlimited.

Economics 101 teaches that as supply goes up, costs should come down. But this tenant doesn’t hold true in medical care – not when the supplier also controls demand.

In health care, doctors can stimulate demand because (a) health insurance blinds most patients to the costs of services and (b) patients often don’t know whether a complex procedure is as necessary as a non-invasive one.

As a result, we have seen a major increase in utilization of complex services over the past 20 years.

That’s a short extract from an important FORBES article, The High Cost Of American Health Care: You Asked For It. Everything in the article is consistent with my understanding of economics and long-held view that the problem with our healthcare system is perverse incentives in the payment model. I highly recommend it. Read More …

Regulations Not Keeping Up with Technology

Health ReformBy Wayne Caswell

The rapid and accelerating pace of tech innovation has profound implications for healthcare delivery & payment, aging, and disability employment, but regulations that support that are spotty or nonexistent.

The good news

“Durable medical equipment” is a class of assistive technology that can be paid for by Medicare, Medicaid and many private insurance plans. Motorized wheel chairs most often fall into this category. Read More …

Telehealth Enhancement Act takes Important Step

Telehealth KioskAs a member of the American Telehealth Association (Austin chapter), I too support the Telehealth Enhancement Act, however I see it as just a baby step and think much more is needed. Still, it’s a step in the right direction.

The proposed bill would modernize the Medicare program by allowing Medicare patients to be cared for remotely by a licensed healthcare provider from any state. That way, if you need medical help while on vacation, you could connect online or by phone with your own doctor back home without requiring that they be licensed in the state you traveled to. I urge Congress to adopt this bill and expand it beyond Medicare, to other federal agencies and health benefit programs.

Read More …

The Forgotten Civil Right – Healthcare

MLK - I have a dreamIn honor of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, Dan Munro wrote a wonderful column on Forbes reminding us that King saw healthcare as a civil right. Sadly, we have made little progress on healthcare inequality, with roughly 50 million Americans without health insurance and another 40 million under-insured.

The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) is poised to relieve some of that, with the individual mandate to buy healthcare insurance and subsidies for low-income Americans. But individual states are still allowed to choose whether or not to support and fund a key component of the ACA – Medicaid expansion. Many will, but some won’t.

Many doctors have walked away from taking Medicaid patients, and some have abandoned Medicare patients too. Read More …

Middle Generation: Rising Cost of Care for America’s Elderly

Middle Generation LadiesBy Caroline Montague

With an aging population and a generation of young adults struggling to achieve financial independence, the burdens and responsibilities of middle-aged Americans are increasing. Nearly half (47 percent) of these adults have a parent age 65 or older and are either raising a young child or financially supporting a grown child (age 18 or older). In addition, about one in seven middle-aged adults (15 percent) are providing financial support to both an aging parent and a child.

Adult children, worried about costs and the loss of their parents’ independence, must make difficult decisions about the best options for care for their loved ones. Assisted living communities, such as Emeritus assisted living, allow individuals to remain independent as long as possible in an environment that maximizes the person’s autonomy, dignity, privacy and safety. These types of communities also encourage family and resident involvement. (Editor: Emeritus is one of the largest and most well known, but you can also compare facilities in your area by zip code.)  Read More …

Understanding Confusing Medical Bills for Seniors

Senior couple studying Confusing Medical BillsThe rising cost of medical bills is a concerning issue, particularly if you are retired and are facing health challenges. As the cost of medical procedures increases, a large number of American adults are filing for bankruptcy. The high cost is expected to cause 1.7 million individuals and families to file for bankruptcy, reported Today.com. Although the numbers are troubling, it does not mean you do not have options to help improve your personal situation.

Check For Obvious Errors

Before you assume that the price given on your medical bill is accurate, read through the details and check it for accuracy. Roughly 80 percent of medical bills have an error, according to Mint.com. The errors can come from simple mistakes in inputting data, coding errors or bugs in the system. Read More …

OBAMACARE – a moving infographic

Obamacare does so many things to give people better access to affordable, quality health care. The folks at Colorado Consumer Health Initiative just like to say THANKS OBAMACARE with this moving infographic about President Obama’s healthcare plan and how it actually helps people. Nothing is perfect, but we think there are a lot of positives that came out of this whole thing, and politicians focus only on negative talking points. ugh.

Long-term Care – 11 Myths and Facts

Long-term Care Myths & FactsMost people over 65 will need some kind of help with the activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, or moving around. The need for such help can stem from a chronic illness or the natural decline of eyesight, hearing, strength, balance, and mobility that comes with aging. It’s never too early, or too late, to start planning for long-term care.

Many people think the phrase “long-term care” refers to an insurance policy. While insurance may be part of your strategy, long-term care encompasses many other decisions. You will need to decide where you will live, how you will navigate the myriad of legal, family, and social dynamics along the way, and the many options for paying for everyday help. Though a number of government programs may help pay for some long-term care services, many people are faced with significant out-of-pocket costs.

In partnership with LongTermCare.gov, Huffington Post took a look at eleven myths that may be keeping some from planning for long-term care, and ways you and your loved ones can prepare for the future.

Myth 1: I won’t need it

About 70 percent of Americans over 65 will need some kind of help with the activities of daily living for months or years as they age. It may be due to an illness, chronic disease, or disability. But often, the care is required because of the natural decline due to aging of one’s eyesight, hearing, strength, balance, or mobility. Read More …