Posts Tagged ‘mobile networks’

Will mHealth be the Next Flight to the Moon?

We Choose To Go To The Moon

By David Lee Scher, MD (12/19/2011)

When President Kennedy in his inaugural address challenged the country to land a man on the moon in ten years, he had no idea how many technologies would be spawned off of such a mission. Technology used in space shuttle fuel pumps, for example, led to the development of a miniature heart pump weighing less than four ounces. A system originally developed to detect shuttle hydrogen gas leaks led Ford to produce a car-powered by natural gas.  Construction of space shuttles led to ‘fly by wire’ control systems and ultimately to ‘drive by wire’ by the auto industry.

I believe that mHealth is taking a similar journey.  The quest for patient-centric healthcare has resulted in enthusiastic participation in mHealth by telecommunications companies, pharmaceutical and medical device companies, insurance companies, healthcare systems, and healthcare providers ranging from dietitians to surgeons. Read the rest of this entry »

The End of Illness

The End of Illness - image from Amazon.comToday’s article is adapted from The End of Illness by Dr. David B. Agus and an ABC News story about his book. (video below)

“The end of illness is closer than you might think,” says Agus, a professor of medicine at USC. But to achieve that, people must look at their bodies in a whole new way. He and many others like him are challenging long-held beliefs about what “health” means and are promoting health & wellness as ways to extend life, improve vitality, and lower the cost of medical care.

As a cancer doctor and researcher on the front lines, Dr. Agus became infuriated by the statistics and lack of progress within the medical profession, and that got him thinking about alternative approaches. He likens it to “having to go to war to understand peace,” since the goal should be to avoid war in the first place. And shouldn’t the same apply to health – striving for ways to eliminate illness rather than just treat its symptoms? Read the rest of this entry »

CES 2012 … in Pajamas

CESinPJs

Did you go to CES this year? What struck you as a highlight (comment below)?

If you didn’t get to go, CES 2012 in Pajamas gives you all of the insight with none of the hassle or expense. This 12-page virtual trip report combines a healthcare and consumer electronics perspective so you can:

  • Learn what the analysts and pundits said.
  • Know about key trends from different perspectives.
  • Discover cool products for digital health & wellness.
  • See the products in action with over 4.5 hours of video.
  • And discover who was missing and the significance.

Headings:

  • About CES
  • Getting the Most from this Report
  • General Media Coverage of CES
  • Is CES becoming Irrelevant?
  • It’s All about the Platform & Ecosystem
  • Smarter, Thinner Televisions
  • Smarter, Thinner PC & Tablets
  • Smartphones & mHealth
  • Healthy Games
  • Home Networking & Energy Management
  • Robots

Be part of the Future of Healthcare. Our in-home evaluation is a fun and education survey that helps medical researchers collect autonomous health information so they can find unexpected correlations and find new treatments. It’s part of the Next Frontier for Big Data.

Do We Need Doctors Or Algorithms?

robot medic

Image credit: Shutterstock/koya979

By Vinod Khosla, founder of Khosla Ventures
(original on TechCrunch.com)

I was asked about a year ago at a talk about energy what I was doing about the other large social problems, namely health care and education. Surprised, I flippantly responded that the best solution was to get rid of doctors and teachers and let your computers do the work, 24/7 and with consistent quality.

Later, I got to cogitating about what I had said and why, and how embarrassingly wrong that might be. But the more I think about it the more I feel my gut reaction was probably right. The beginnings of “Doctor Algorithm” or Dr. A for short, most likely (and that does not mean “certainly” or “maybe”) will be much criticized. We’ll see all sorts of press wisdom decrying “they don’t work” or “look at all the silly things they come up with.” But Dr A. will get better and better and will go from providing “bionic assistance” to second opinions to assisting doctors to providing first opinions and as referral computers (with complete and accurate synopses and all possible hypotheses of the hardest cases) to the best 20% of the human breed doctors. And who knows what will happen beyond that?

Read the rest of this entry »

A Doctor in Your Pocket: Future of Personalized Medicine

image by Alex Nabaum, WSJWhat does the future of medicine hold?

Tiny health monitors and tailored therapies, says David B. Agus, author of ”The End of Illness,” a book to be published Tuesday by Free Press. Yesterday’s Wall Street Journal published an adaptation of that, and my posting here is a short summary of the WSJ article.

Dr. Agus believes that most of the medical conditions that kill us, such as cancer and heart disease, can be prevented or delayed with personalized medicine, but we don’t yet know enough about how the body works to do the things that avoid causes and prevent illness. He thinks, however, that the end of illness is near.

He describes the future of medicine as holding a big shift from the today’s model, where we currently wait for the body to break before we treat it. We’ll soon be able to  adjust our health in real time with help from smartphone apps and wearable sensors that track proteins and the inner workings of cells. We’ll monitor what happens when we exercise, eat more salmon or dark chocolate, or take drug x at dosage y.

Read the rest of this entry »

mHealth and Child Abuse

child abuseby David Lee Scher, MD (11/9/2011)

There has not been a more horrific scandal in the world of sports that I can remember than the child abuse scandal (the mainstream media calls it a sex abuse scandal) surrounding The Pennsylvania State University.  Let it be said that I am very impressed with the reaction of much of the student body which is one of shock and disdain for the administration charged with covering up alleged abuses of children by a former assistant football coach. According to the grand jury’s report, the school demonstrated willful blindness to the allegations brought to it, none going to state officials. Some of the fans at Saturday’s PSU-Nebraska football game are organizing a blue shirt campaign to show solidarity for the victims (blue ribbon being a symbol of child abuse).

As this blogger is an evangelist for wireless technologies and the noble things it will deliver (efficient, dignified, cost-effective and better continuous healthcare), I think it fitting to discuss how mHealth technologies may, in the future, be useful tools for subjects of child abuse and their loved ones.  Read the rest of this entry »

RWTH Aachen University studies eHealth

Germany’s RWTH Aachen University built this Future Care Lab to study smart healthcare technologies – eHealth – and is working with consumers to understand their needs and wants and how they might use technology.

 

ZOMM’s Lifestyle Connect wins 3 CES Innovation Awards

ZOMM Lifestyle ConnectZOMM earned 3 CES 2012 Innovation Awards this week for Lifestyle Connect™, a credit card sized accessory for any Bluetooth®-enabled phone, including the one you have right now. With a touch of a button or an alert from wireless sensors, the device can summon assistance from a Personal Safety Concierge™ or your trusted network of friends, family and health professionals. If needed, the concierge will dispatch police, fire or medical rescue personnel to the user’s location.

Lifestyle Connect utilizes Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low Energy wireless technology to connect with Bluetooth Smart devices such as health monitors, heart monitors, glucose monitors, fall detection sensors, and activity trackers.

Read the rest of this entry »

MIT researchers use smart phones to monitor health

Phones Old NewThis article by John Tozzi reports on how MIT researchers are using smartphones to monitor a patient’s daily activity and report deviations to friends or doctors should they may need to intervene.

Although the trials are in early stages and there are still regulatory and personal privacy issues to resolve, it seems telephones can reveal a lot about our mood, health, and cognitive ability. Intel’s Eric Dishman explains this in a video on our Healthcare Problems & Solutions page where he uses an old, analog, rotary-dial phone to show subtle differences in how someone answers the phone as dementia sets in.

Besides just recording call frequency, duration, who called, etc., smartphones can report much more. They can monitor movement outside of the home – or even inside with an accelerometer, and of course, there are many medical sensors that can communicate through the smartphone to remote monitoring services. For related articles on sensor technologies for home healthcare, search this site for “sensors.” You’ll see that Home Automation sensors and wearable devices can obscurely monitor activity when someone doesn’t have a smartphone on them, but the phone seems like an ideal device for this purpose.

MIT’s work analyzing smartphone data relates to other interesting trends including DNA typing and personal traits typing. They are all data mining applications that depend on the analysis of massive databases – big data – and can lead toward personalized medicine.

The Caregiver: Key to mHealth

By David Lee Scher, MD

The caregiver is an individual who attends to the needs of a child or dependent adult.

Parent as caregiver for her child

There is an estimated ten million caregivers over the age of 50 caring for their parents in the USA.  Caregivers attend to people who are predominantly relatives (86%), with 36% being parents and 14% being children.  One third of caregivers take care of two or more people.  Much has been said about the need for patient engagement and people taking more responsibility for their own care, however caregivers have the unique responsibilities of their own care as well as their charged.  That being said, they require mHealth tools that address both issues.  I will discuss the role of mHealth and the role of the caregiver.  This will not be an endorsement of any specific product.

Read the rest of this entry »

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