Posts Tagged ‘prevention’

Can Fall Monitoring Technology Keep Elders Safe?

Falling DownBy Rein Tideiksaar Ph.D., PA-C

The most effective way for elders and/or their caregivers to address the issue of falling is to:

  • First, visit the doctor and find out why a loved one is at risk or why falls are occurring (remember that falls are not normal but may represent an underlying health condition requiring investigation).
  • Second, after fall risk factors and/or causes of falling have been identified, elders and their caregivers can address those risks by taking proper steps to avoid fallsRead the rest of this entry »

Caring for a Stroke Patient

Caring for a Stroke PatientBy Rohit Agarwal

Stroke also referred to as ‘Cardiovascular Accident’, is a type of a medical condition involving brain function disturbance due to lack of blood flow to the brain. There can be a number of causes that lead to a stroke, like blockages and hemorrhages.

This is a high level medical emergency that can be fatal. There is a high risk of a stroke to people of old age, diabetic patients, people who take high cholesterol diet, consumption of alcohol and smoking. Stokes should be taken seriously as it is considered to be the second leading cause of death in the world.

When a person survives a stroke there is always a risk of further repercussions that might include a second stroke, decreased brain functions, temporary loss of dexterity and paralysis. Hence, special care should be given not only in the hospital but at home as well, so we discuss home care tips for stroke patients. Read the rest of this entry »

Online Behavior That Makes Seniors Vulnerable

Anti-Virus SoftwareBy Diana Henderson

Today’s senior citizens didn’t grow up with the internet, but many of them are making it an important part of their daily lives. According to the Pew Research Center, over half of all Americans over 65 use the internet regularly, and a third of them use social media. These users have come late to the party, and are rarely as savvy about internet theft as those who grew up using the technology. Educating seniors about the dangers lurking on the internet will go a long way toward saving their financial safety. Read the rest of this entry »

Remain Active

Remain Active, Ease Arthritis Pain and Keep Joints Healthy

TricepStretch2TricepStretchThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that an estimated 50 million adults in the U.S. have doctor-diagnosed arthritis, with that number expected to rise to nearly 70 million by 2030. Scientific studies indicate individuals suffering from arthritis who participate in moderate-intensity, low-impact activity have improved mood, function and decreased pain. Remaining active may also delay disability due to arthritis.
Read the rest of this entry »

Help Seniors Live Safely & Comfortably.

Portrait of a beautiful senior woman smiling at home

Help Seniors Live Safely & Comfortably
by Eliminating Safety Hazards at Home

Guest article by Anna Graves, a freelance writer
who lives on a farm in upstate New York.

Researchers from Colorado State University reported what most of us long suspected—the number one reason seniors fall in their home is tripping over something they didn’t see on the floor. The dangers don’t stop at the front door, either; uneven sidewalks, poor lighting and steep inclines present challenges for seniors. While you can’t remove every risk of a fall, you can explore your options to ensure your home (or the home of an elderly parent or friend) is safe.

First Things First

Every room in the home has potential dangers. Take a tour of the home with a friend or relative and look for hidden risks of a fall. Read the rest of this entry »

100 Ways To Live To 100

Live to be 150

An ABC Barbara Walters Special featured five centenarians, pictured L-R: Dorothy Young, “Rosie” Ross, Lillian Cox, Barbara Walters, Dr. Karl Hartzell and Elsa Hoffmann.

Want to add more and better years to your life? Now is the time.

We’re living longer than ever: The average American born in 2013 will be alive nearly four years longer than someone born 20 years ago. But until recently, it wasn’t clear if the years we’ve added to our lives were good-quality years.

A recent study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School starts to answer that question. Researchers found that today, 25 year olds can expect to live “2.4 more years of a healthy life” and 65 year olds can look forward to 1.7 extra healthy years than people who lived two decades back.

Find out what you’re already doing right and where you can still improve in our list of 100 ways to live to 100. (This Huffington Post article expands on each of the items listed below.) Read the rest of this entry »

Elders Get a CAPABLE Hand in Shoring Up Home Safety

Jack and Jill, a Mother Goose nursery rhyme

Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

CAPABLE, which stands for Community Aging in Place, Advancing Better Living for Elders, is a Baltimore-based project that helps low-income older adults “age in place” with assistance from occupational therapists, nurses and handymen.

The project is being closely watched by Medicaid officials in other states as a way to coordinate care, improve personal function, and avoid pricey and sometimes preventable nursing home admissions. Today, it’s difficult for Medicaid patients to get these services.

With more than $8 million in research money from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the project goes beyond home repair for health. It starts with a full-scale assessment of each participant’s needs.  Read the rest of this entry »

Redefining Success – The Third Metric

Redefining Success, The Third MetricJust 30% of full time workers are engaged at work, while half are uninspired, and another 30% simply “roam the halls” spreading discontent. Some call this presenteeism. Either way, there’s a personal and economic cost.

A Huffington Post article and infographic (below) encourages us to re-think what success means and reassess our priorities, possibly leading to jobs that we really WANT to be doing.

According to Arianna Huffington, “We’ve all bought into this male definition of success, money and power, and it’s not working. It’s not working for men, and it’s not working for women. It’s not working for anyone.”

That’s where their Third Metric infographic comes into play. After the graphic I list some of the key points, as well as related statistics from a similar infographic on sleep. That way, blind people using screen readers can “see” the data too.

Read the rest of this entry »

Parenting Your Parents on Phishing and Identity Theft

HackingBy Thomas Richardson

Editor: I’ll add some of my own advice in teal.

In 2012, approximately 12.6 million Americans were the victims of identity theft, according to NBC News. Predators in nature, identity thieves like to target the aged and weak, singling them out as easy-to-ambush prey. And, according to the FBI, the elderly do tend to have certain attributes that make them especially choice targets for con artists. For example, senior citizens are usually more trusting than younger generations and fall easier for identity theft scams, such as phishing. Many seniors also have a substantial nest egg saved up, making them even more attractive as potential victims.

If you have elderly relatives, educate them about the many types of identity theft scams, especially phishing. Otherwise, they could become victims of identity theft and even potentially lose their entire life savings to these crooks. Read the rest of this entry »

Is Your Glass Half Empty, or Half Full?

Is your glass Half Empty, or Half Ful?Can your attitude affect your health?

YES. According to this article and most of the studies I found, optimism appears to be good for your health and pessimism seems to be bad. But I also found one study that suggested the opposite – that people who are overly optimistic about their future actually faced greater risk of disability or death within 10 years than did those pessimists who expected their future to be worse. So I guess the question about the glass being half full or half empty still depends on your perspective.

Optimism about the Future

This week I was one of several presenters giving short talks to the World Future Society about what makes us optimistic about the future. Rather than rant about health reform, as I often do, I chose instead to talk about BIG Broadband and Google’s choice of Austin for its next gigabit fiber network, Kansas City being their first. I spoke of the applications enabled by Internet access that’s more than 100 times faster than what we currently have, how it enables exciting new applications and innovations in telehealth, telework, distance learning, e-commerce, e-government, and more.

But this article takes a different spin, with text provided by Anne Boysen, one of the other speakers. Her interesting approach fits nicely with the half empty / half full question, because she looks at several trends that bring out the pessimist in us, followed by balancing trends that give us hope.
Read the rest of this entry »

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