Posts Tagged ‘regulatory’

Telehealth Legal Obstacles Delay Home Healthcare

Doctor Robot

DOCTOR ROBOT: Technology like this RP-VITA device at Mercy San Juan Hospital in Carmichael, Calif., lets doctors beam themselves to remote patient bedsides, but government rules need to catch up. (AP / Rich Pedroncelli)

Home telehealth” technology promises to be a critical component of providing quality care to the growing number of Americans who need long-term services and supports to “age in place” at home. Home telehealth and related technology can make it cheaper, easier and more comfortable for seniors to remain at home and avoid nursing facility placement.

But government regulations lag behind telehealth technology, according to this article in the National Law Journal. This is disappointing because “24-hour monitoring would allow Americans who need long-term care to ‘age in place’ at home.”  Read the rest of this entry »

Precision Medicine vs Prevention & Wellness

Health iconsPresident Obama and the National Institutes of Health have announced a Precision Medicine Initiative that complements other programs for Prevention and Wellness. That’s important because too many diseases don’t have a proven means of prevention or effective treatments.

Read the rest of this entry »

Are You Ready for Some Sensors… in Healthcare?

Activity Trackers

Some wearables (photo from BIONICLY.com)

They’re Everywhere! They’re Everywhere! Sensors that is, and it seems they sense everything too.

Here’s a tiny subset:

  • Temperature (e.g. thermostat)
  • Light (photocell)
  • Sound & Vibration (microphone)
  • Proximity (motion sensor, Doppler radar, stud finder)
  • Pressure (altimeter, barometer, tire pressure)
  • Magnetism (security contact switch)
  • Chemicals (smoke, radon & CO2 sensors)
  • Fluid Flow (water & gas meters)
  • Electric Current (electric meter)
  • Moisture (humidifier, leak detector, rain gauge)
  • Radiation & Subatomic Particles (Geiger counter)
  • Speed, Distance & Acceleration (odometer, tachometer, accelerometer)
  • Pressure (barometer)
  • Force (strain gauge)

Read the rest of this entry »

Telehealth is Shaping Healthcare for the Better

Game ChangerBy Karen R. Thomas, President of Advanced TeleHealth Solutions (original article here)

As incredibly innovative and efficient as telehealth is at providing greater access to care for consumers, lowering healthcare costs for both patients and healthcare systems, and improving outcomes, barriers have always existed that hinder the widespread adoption of telehealth. Yet recently, issues such as state requirement hurdles, reimbursement limitations, and a general resistance from physicians to learn and integrate new technologies into their care routines are quickly evaporating in the wake of the overwhelming proof of telemedicine’s many benefits. Read the rest of this entry »

Hyper Growth of Private Insurance Exchanges

Shared with permission from MEDCITY News, by Dan Verel, 7/25/2015

Accenture Figure 1

While much attention has been heaped on the public health insurance exchanges over the year, private health insurance exchanges “are experiencing hyper-growth” and enrollment could exceed that of public exchanges by 2017, “if not sooner,” according to Accenture. Read the rest of this entry »

Get the Health Incentives Right

MotivationThis post is based on a comment I made when Pritpal Tamber called for “Creating a parallel system to health care” in MedCity News.

At least for consumers, Modern Health Talk (www.mHealthTalk.com) can already be called the “Institute for New Health Thinking,” with over 100 articles on Legislative, Public Policy, and Health Reform topics written for consumers.

I personally think it all comes down to getting the INCENTIVES right, as I wrote two years ago when proposing a hybrid, public/private model of health care. The goal was to exploit the different incentives of private sector organizations that measure success in business terms such as profit, ROI, and payback period, with that of the public sector, which measures success quite differently and over much longer time periods.  Read the rest of this entry »

Early-Stage Obamacare – How’s it Going?

Is your glass Half Empty, or Half Ful?EDITOR: Opinions of Obamacare, and whether it’s a glass half empty or half full, depend largely on one’s political viewpoint and sources of your information. Opponents of the law, including many in the medical industrial complex with lots to lose if health reform cuts costs, often cite articles hinting that it’s a failure, while proponents cite articles highlighting successes and progress. The mainstream media, in efforts to generate buzz and attention, seem to stoke the fires of controversy by avoiding the hard task of investigative journalism and simply publishing inflammatory stories fed to them by either political party without checking the facts. Then again, the official government numbers, which you can believe or not based on your politics, present a moving target. So, I’m more interested in the trends and the long-term implications and publish today’s byline article with some editorial comments added.

Early-Stage Obamacare:
A Checkup on the Health of the Affordable Care Act Thus Far

By Paisley Hansen

What will be the ultimate impact–for good or bad–of the Affordable Care Act on Americans? Although it’s still too early to tell, a January 13 article by the Associated Press posted on AOL sheds some light on the health status of Obamacare thus far [2.2M through December, 2013]. Read the rest of this entry »

Austin Requires New Homes to be Accessible

Wheelchair Lady doing Laundry

Austin city council passes accessibility,
ramp ordinances for new homes

AUSTIN, TX (1/30/2014) — After two years of working on an ordinance amendment, the Austin City Council passed changes Thursday that will require all new homes be more accessible and visitable to people with mobility disabilities.

The idea to require changes to make housing more accessible first came up inside City Hall back in 1998. That’s when Austin adopted the changes for homes built with city funds. The intention was that it would lead to an across the board policy, but that never came to be.

City staff and council members have spent the last two years working with stakeholders to draft an ordinance amendment.

After much debate, and several postponements, the council passed the ordinance amendment 6-1 with Mayor Lee Leffingwell voting against the measure. Read the rest of this entry »

We Endorse Telehealth Across State Lines

Medicine Unplugged: Your phone, your DNA, your data

By Wayne Caswell

Modern Health Talk strongly endorses telehealth and efforts to break down barriers to wider adoption nationwide. The TELE-MED Act of 2013 (HR 3077) is still not out of committee but is intended to start breaking down barriers related to licensure and payment when medical care is given online across state lines, starting with Medicare providers. Hopefully Congress will pass this bill and then start extending telehealth to all insurance carriers. Read the rest of this entry »

Regulations Not Keeping Up with Technology

Health ReformBy Wayne Caswell

The rapid and accelerating pace of tech innovation has profound implications for healthcare delivery & payment, aging, and disability employment, but regulations that support that are spotty or nonexistent.

The good news

“Durable medical equipment” is a class of assistive technology that can be paid for by Medicare, Medicaid and many private insurance plans. Motorized wheel chairs most often fall into this category. Read the rest of this entry »

Awards
Modern Health Talk won a Best in Business award from the City of Cedar Park.
Wayne Caswell is a recognized eLocal expert panelist and often comments on their online polls.
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