Research Funding and Hope for Alzheimer’s Disease?

Is there hope for Alzheimer’s disease?

Can Alzheimer's be stopped? a NOVA broadcast

This past week NOVA aired Can Alzheimer’s Be Stopped? (watch below) The program covered research funded by drug companies as they race to cure Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The profit potential from discovering a breakthrough cure, as noted at the beginning, is well into the Billions. Sadly, a treatment without a cure may be worth even more. So hence the race, given the large and growing numbers of people affected and the devastating impact the disease has on them, their caregivers, and society. Read More …

Wireless Networks and Electromagnetic Radiation

Schumann Resonance

RESONANCE is eye-opening documentary, revealing the biological harm from wireless networks and electromagnetic radiation. The entire documentary is included here with some added comments. Most troubling to me are the long-term effects of electromagnetic radiation on cellular structures, cancer, and Melatonin, an important antioxidant and sleep-inducing hormone. Read More …

Mindfulness and Sleep

The Magic of Mindfulness

Mindfulness

Mindfulness. It’s a buzz word right now.

Guest article by Amanda Gore (original on Huffington Post)

Businesses are more conscious of the bottom line results of being more mindful and teaching their people to do so. CEOs are being coached to be more mindful to improve their leadership skills. Students are being taught to be more mindful to do better in tests. Everyone is jumping on the mindfulness bandwagon!   

WHY MINDFULNESS?

Because our lifestyles encourage us to be mind-less! Read More …

What is a Sleep Economist?

The Sleep Economist

By Wayne Caswell, Founder of Modern Health Talk and Sleep Economist at Intelligent Sleep

What is a Sleep Economist?

I’m a sleep economist. At least that’s how I present myself when I talk about the economic impact and benefits of sleep, and the science of Intelligent Sleep. But what does that mean? Let me explain.

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), “Insufficient Sleep is a Public Health Epidemic,” and getting enough sleep is an absolute necessity, not a luxury. They also say sleep quality should be thought of as a “vital sign” of good health because of the many ways it impacts us overall. Read More …

Why Blue Light is so Important to Sleep and Health

NASA Sunrise

Why Blue Light is so Important to Sleep and Health

by Leanne Venier, BSME, CP AOBTA

SUBSCRIBE to receive Leanne’s free tips on using Color, Light, Art & Flow State (aka The Zone) for Optimal Health & Healing and Peak Creativity & Productivity.

Blue Light Photoreceptors

Scientific research since 2002 has shown that in addition to the well-known Rods and Cones in our eyes, we also have “Blue light photoreceptors” (ie. melanopsin retinal ganglion cells, a new type of photoreceptor in the eye first discovered in 1998). These “blue light photoreceptors” directly influence our circadian (daily) rhythms.

How Do These Blue Light Photoreceptors Control our Circadian Rhythms? And how can this help my Sleep, Jet Lag or Seasonal Affective Disorder (winter blues)? Read More …

Digital Health at CES 2016

Digital Health at CES

EDITOR:  The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is one of the largest trade shows and conferences in the world, with well over 150,000 attendees, including more than 30,000 international attendees from 140 countries. Each January they come to Las Vegas, NV to see the latest tech products from over 3,000 exhibitors or showcase their own. Nowhere else on earth can you see and experience so much in such a short space of time. That’s why I love attending, but now I do it without the expense and hassle of traveling there.

For background, I’ve attended big technology shows like COMDEX & CES as an exhibitor, speaker or attendee for some 30 years, and while still at IBM I organized one of the first Hot Spots (now TechZones). It was for Home Networking just after I introduced IBM to the Connected Home concept (in 1994) and while I held leadership positions in some industry standards groups.

My CES coverage starts with an article by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn about what to expect, which first appeared in Huffington Post. It’s followed by links to Related Articles that you won’t want to miss if you’re a tech geek like me. Read More …

This Year, Resolve to Sleep More

You are 10 times more likely to stick to a change made at the New Year, according to Dr. Mike Evans.Resolve to sleep more as a New Year’s resolution, because scientific study shows that, “You are 10 times more likely to stick to a change made at the New Year,” and other studies say you’re even more successful if you get the support of others. So now is the time to make those commitments, as we approach the year’s end. This video and article will help.  Read More …

One Poll surveys 1000 people about Sleep – Interesting

New Survey Explains the Importance of Sleep

By Paula Davis-Laack, Lawyer turned burnout prevention expert

OnePoll Sleep SurveyAre you a sleep worker?

No, not a sleepwalker, but a person who goes to work and attempts to function on too little sleep? It turns out, one-third of American workers are sleep working — not getting enough sleep to function at peak levels, according to researchers at Harvard Medical School.

On the home front, men and women experience interrupted sleep, but often for different reasons. Women are more than twice as likely to interrupt their sleep to care for others, and once they’re up, they are awake longer: 44 minutes, compared with 30 minutes for men.

According to a new sleep survey conducted by One Poll, 1,000 people aged 18 – 55+ were asked a series of questions about their sleep habits. Here are some of the findings: Read More …

How Light from Electronics Affects Sleep

While the warm orange glow of a campfire promotes good sleep, the cool bluish light of a tablet or PC inhibit good sleep.

If you’re having trouble sleeping, it may be your electronics.

As I wrote in How Light effects Melatonin and Sleep, the hormone melatonin helps regulate our sleep & wake cycles (the circadian clock). Production of this hormone is triggered by darkness and inhibited by light, and that helps explain why we have trouble with jet lag, shift work, and winter months with fewer daylight hours. But it’s not just the availability or intensity of light; it’s also the color temperature, and it’s been that way for thousands of years.

We’re genetically programmed to get sleepy at dark and wake in the light of day, but man’s DNA has not evolved as fast as electricity or electronics. The flickering flame of a campfire, with its warm orange glow, plays a role in getting our bodies ready for sleep, as does the bright morning sunlight that helps us wake up. So it’s not surprising that the cool blue light of a television, PC, or tablet does the same thing.

Read More …

Sleep Problems in Dementia

How to Manage Sleep Problems in Dementia

Click image to view original article.

Sleep problems are common in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. They are also a common source of tension for family caregivers, because when your spouse or parent with Alzheimer’s doesn’t sleep well, this often means that you don’t sleep well.

To make matters even worse, not getting enough sleep can worsen the behavior and mindset of someone with dementia. Of course, this is true for those of us who don’t have Alzheimer’s as well: we all become more prone to emotional instability and irritation when we’re tired. Studies have also shown that even younger healthy people perform worse on cognitive tests when they are sleep-deprived. Read More …

Secrets of the Brain – from cradle to grave

My interest in the brain started with an understanding how sleep affects health and performance; so I was especially inspired by the PBS programs I share in this post. They help us understand how wonderful and adaptable this three pound organ is, how our abilities and personalities are formed, and how external forces impact our choices and even our politics. The videos will give you new perspectives of mental health, whether you have an aging loved one with Alzheimer’s or a young child with a learning disability. Read More …

Chipping Away at Healthcare Special Interests Yet?

Is it just “One Step Forward and Two Steps Back?” or is something bigger happening?

Last week I read an excellent article in Huffington Post by Charles Francis, and it inspired today’s post about public interests versus special interests. In this article I’ll reflect on the healthcare progress consumers are making despite politicians working against them. But first, more on the obstacles we face.

Special Interests Pull Puppet Strings

In How Mindfulness Meditation Can Transform Health Care, Charles examines the need to change consumer behavior toward healthier lifestyles, so I thought about the role of incentives and awareness education. I’ve written about that before, but today I’ll take a broader look at the many factors influencing the health and productivity of our nation’s workforce and why I remain guardedly optimistic that we’ll overcome political corruption. Included are links to many related articles and this list of over 130 past articles on healthcare policy. Read More …

Technology, and Parents, can Prevent Drowsy Driving

Parents, Prevent drowsy driving among teens.

1 In 5 Accidents Are Caused By Drowsy Driving. This Group Intends To Get That Number To Zero. Click on image to read Huffington Post article by Alena Hall. (UpperCut Images by Getty Images)

Last week (Nov.1-8) was Drowsy Driving Prevention Week, so I’m a bit late in posting this, using info from two Huffington Post articles.

Data shows that driving after pulling an all-nighter studying or working is as dangerous as driving drunk, with risks for you and everyone around you, but it occurs way too frequently. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conservatively says that some 100,000 police-reported crashes caused by driver fatigue are reported each year, resulting in an estimated 1,550 deaths, 71,000 injuries, and $12.5 billion in monetary losses. Read More …

Sleep-Deprived or Darkness-Deprived?

Are we sleep-deprived or just darkness-deprived?

By Richard G ‘Bugs’ Stevens, University of Connecticut

Blue light disrupts melatonin production. (Sleeping Boy via www.shutterstock.com)

Blue light disrupts melatonin production. (Sleeping Boy via www.shutterstock.com)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that insufficient sleep is a serious public health concern, because it can lead to many immediate dangers such as car crashes as well as long-term health problems like diabetes. The blame for sleep deprivation is often pinned on our fast-paced, 24/7 lifestyle, made possible by electric lighting at all times of day and night.

But are we really getting too little sleep? Read More …

Prepare for the Time Change

Sleepy Pumpkin

Prepare for the Time Change
that comes after Halloween

The biannual shift between Standard Time and Daylight Savings Time is like a society-imposed jet lag that can throw off your body clock and disrupt your sleep patterns. In the Spring we set our clocks forward overnight and thus lose an hour of sleep, and in the Fall we have the opportunity to gain an hour of sleep.

It’s Confusing.

Read More …

Sleep Technology use by Seniors

Today’s guest post on Sleep Technology use by seniors is written by Barry Birkett and first appeared in Senior Care Corner.

A Good Night Sleep and Our Seniors:
Can Technology Help Them Meet?

Sleep is important to us at all ages, but to seniors it can be a matter of health and safety.

Yes, safety. Too many of our senior loved ones are injured, some with long-term impacts, by falls that might not have happened if they had been sleeping well.

Getting enough sleep is more than just a matter of not feeling tired.

We have discussed seniors and sleep in a number of articles here at Senior Care Corner®, helping family caregivers to understand and address this important aspect of daily life. If it matters to our senior loved ones, after all, it matters to us.

Technology and sleep is a topic we haven’t addressed, even though we talk often about what tech can mean to seniors and caregivers.

Thanks to a new report from the Consumer Electronics Association and National Sleep Foundation, we have some information to bridge that gap. Read More …

How You Can Help Save Our Sleepy Students

Summer vacation is about to end, and the new school year is upon us, so I urge everyone with children or grandchildren to read and share this article. As I modeled in The Economic Value of Sleep, that can be worth millions of dollars in lifelong earnings and healthcare savings. It can also be a lifesaver, literally.

The research is in, and studies show that sleep duration and quality has a profound impact on health, safety and performance; but well over half of adults don’t sleep well enough, and a third sleep less than 6 hours/night when 7-9 is recommended. It’s much worse with adolescents since 70-90% don’t get enough sleep. The problem is now so bad that the CDC called insufficient sleep “a public health epidemic.”

UPDATE: The CDC just issued a press release saying, “Most US middle and high schools start the school day too early,” and suggested that later start times are important if students are to get enough sleep. 

How much sleep do sleepy students need? According to SleepFoundation.org, newborns need 14-17 hours of sleep per day, infants need 12-15, toddlers 11-14, preschoolers 10-13, school age 9-11, teens 8-10, adults 7-9, and seniors 7-8. Read More …

2015 Alzheimer’s Statistics

EDITOR: These stats are from Alzheimers.net, an online community dedicated to education, advocacy and supporting those whose lives have been impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Alzheimers.net was created by people touched by Alzheimer’s to give caregivers, those with Alzheimer’s a place to share our passion for change and a cure for the disease. I added a short section on the impact of sleep duration & quality and a related infographic.

Alzheimer’s Statistics Worldwide

2015 Alzheimer's Statistics

  • Worldwide, nearly 44 million people have Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)
  • Only 1-in-4 people with Alzheimer’s disease have been diagnosed. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)
  • Alzheimer’s and dementia is most common in Western Europe (North America is close behind)
  • Alzheimer’s is least prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)
  • Alzheimer’s and other dementias are the top cause for disabilities in later life. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)

Read More …

Mysterious World of Sleep

 

Woman sleeping in bed (Getty Images/Tetra Images RF)

Woman sleeping in bed (Getty Images/Tetra Images RF)

The Mysterious World of Sleep

Byline article by Tom Allon (original in Huffington Post)

I’ve been thinking a lot about sleep lately. It’s a topic many complain about and discuss occasionally with friends and family, but it still remains a very mysterious topic to most people around the world.

After air, water and food, it’s probably the most essential thing in our lives to ensure our health and daily functioning. And although it’s self evident, it bears repeating that almost all humans spend one third of their lives (25-30 years) sleeping. Read More …