Wireless Networks and Electromagnetic Radiation

Schumann Resonance

RESONANCE is eye-opening documentary, revealing the biological harm from and health impact of wireless networks and electromagnetic radiation. The entire documentary is included here with some added comments. Most troubling to me are the long-term effects of electromagnetic radiation on cellular structures, cancer, and Melatonin, an important antioxidant and sleep-inducing hormone. Read More …

Mindfulness and Sleep

The Magic of Mindfulness

Mindfulness

Mindfulness. It’s a buzz word right now.

Guest article by Amanda Gore (original on Huffington Post)

Businesses are more conscious of the bottom line results of being more mindful and teaching their people to do so. CEOs are being coached to be more mindful to improve their leadership skills. Students are being taught to be more mindful to do better in tests. Everyone is jumping on the mindfulness bandwagon!   

WHY MINDFULNESS?

Because our lifestyles encourage us to be mind-less! Read More …

What is a Sleep Economist?

The Sleep Economist

By Wayne Caswell, Founder of Modern Health Talk and Sleep Economist at Intelligent Sleep

What is a Sleep Economist?

I’m a sleep economist. At least that’s how I present myself when I talk about the economic impact and benefits of sleep, and the science of Intelligent Sleep. But what does that mean? Let me explain.

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), “Insufficient Sleep is a Public Health Epidemic,” and getting enough sleep is an absolute necessity, not a luxury. They also say sleep quality should be thought of as a “vital sign” of good health because of the many ways it impacts us overall. Read More …

HEALTH or SICK Care?

 

Health or Sick Care

Dr. Sachin H. Jain wrote a good article in Forbes calling for Redesigning Health Care to Meet the Needs of Our Sickest Patients, and I’m publishing my response here.

“While I understand the need to improve care of our sickest and most frail elderly patients, my view conflicts with that of the medical industry, which we mistakenly call the “healthcare” industry.  Read More …

‘The Patient Will See You Now’ Envisions New Era

The Patient Will See You Now (book)The Patient Will See You Now’ is a book by Dr. Eric Topol that envisions a New Era in healthcare where we consumers take more responsibility for our own health and wellness and have the tools to do so. Often these are smaller, cheaper, and easier to use versions of what doctors have used for years, but digital and in some cases more accurate or beneficial.

Dr. Abigail Zuger wrote a review of Topol’s book for The New York Times and described the overall thesis as “the old days of ‘doctor knows best’ are as good as gone. No longer will doctors control medical data, treatment or profits. Instead, thanks to the newest science, humanity will finally achieve truly democratic health care: Up with patients! ‘Our Bodies, Our Selves’ for all!”

As Tool says in the following video, “What bothers me most about healthcare is the unwillingness to give rightful info to patients.”

Read More …

Digital Health at CES 2016

Digital Health at CES

EDITOR:  The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is one of the largest trade shows and conferences in the world, with well over 150,000 attendees, including more than 30,000 international attendees from 140 countries. Each January they come to Las Vegas, NV to see the latest tech products from over 3,000 exhibitors or showcase their own. Nowhere else on earth can you see and experience so much in such a short space of time. That’s why I love attending, but now I do it without the expense and hassle of traveling there.

For background, I’ve attended big technology shows like COMDEX & CES as an exhibitor, speaker or attendee for some 30 years, and while still at IBM I organized one of the first Hot Spots (now TechZones). It was for Home Networking just after I introduced IBM to the Connected Home concept (in 1994) and while I held leadership positions in some industry standards groups.

My CES coverage starts with an article by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn about what to expect, which first appeared in Huffington Post. It’s followed by links to Related Articles that you won’t want to miss if you’re a tech geek like me. Read More …

One Poll surveys 1000 people about Sleep – Interesting

New Survey Explains the Importance of Sleep

By Paula Davis-Laack, Lawyer turned burnout prevention expert

OnePoll Sleep SurveyAre you a sleep worker?

No, not a sleepwalker, but a person who goes to work and attempts to function on too little sleep? It turns out, one-third of American workers are sleep working — not getting enough sleep to function at peak levels, according to researchers at Harvard Medical School.

On the home front, men and women experience interrupted sleep, but often for different reasons. Women are more than twice as likely to interrupt their sleep to care for others, and once they’re up, they are awake longer: 44 minutes, compared with 30 minutes for men.

According to a new sleep survey conducted by One Poll, 1,000 people aged 18 – 55+ were asked a series of questions about their sleep habits. Here are some of the findings: Read More …

How Light from Electronics Affects Sleep

While the warm orange glow of a campfire promotes good sleep, the cool bluish light of a tablet or PC inhibit good sleep.

If you’re having trouble sleeping, it may be your electronics.

As I wrote in How Light effects Melatonin and Sleep, the hormone melatonin helps regulate our sleep & wake cycles (the circadian clock). Production of this hormone is triggered by darkness and inhibited by light, and that helps explain why we have trouble with jet lag, shift work, and winter months with fewer daylight hours. But it’s not just the availability or intensity of light; it’s also the color temperature, and it’s been that way for thousands of years.

We’re genetically programmed to get sleepy at dark and wake in the light of day, but man’s DNA has not evolved as fast as electricity or electronics. The flickering flame of a campfire, with its warm orange glow, plays a role in getting our bodies ready for sleep, as does the bright morning sunlight that helps us wake up. So it’s not surprising that the cool blue light of a television, PC, or tablet does the same thing.

Read More …

Are Our Plates Too Full? A Nation Confronts Addiction

By David L. Katz

Earlier this month, thanks largely to the influence and convening power of Dr. Mehmet Oz, the nation was invited to talk about addiction. Among those weighing in to lend support, on air and via social media, was the nation’s Surgeon General, Dr. Vivek Murthy.The National Night of Conversation - about Addiction

The symbol chosen for the campaign was an empty plate, the image meant to convey that this night — the conversation and related food for thought — matter more than the food. Something additional suggests itself to me, however, especially as I try to get this column written (as I promised I would): catch up and then keep up with demands as furious and frenetic as a swarm of bees. Maybe our plates are generally way too full.

I really have no cause to complain on my own behalf. Yes, I am too busy, and yes, I do often feel like Sisyphus. But I have a loving family and plenty of support. Many are not so fortunate. Read More …

Enjoy Aging! And What’s Going On With Your Body

Enjoy Aging!

By Alfred Stallion

Elderly Couple
Aging is a fact of life and part of this is a change in your body’s ability to handle certain tasks, an increase in vulnerability to illness, and a variety of other conditions that can affect your ability to do things that were once straightforward. By understanding the natural changes that occur in your body with age, you can expect them and adjust accordingly, ensuring that you enjoy an active and happy life. Read More …

Transforming Our Flawed Healthcare System

Data shows how most of healthcare’s inflation has resulted from increased administrative spendingData shows how most of healthcare’s inflation has resulted from increased administrative spending.

According to a Forbes article by Dave Chase, “The current U.S. healthcare system is a deeply flawed and wasteful system that has caused enormous damage to our economy and society. It has decimated household incomes, retirement accounts, education budgets, government services budgets, and more. It’s estimated that nearly half of all spending in the current healthcare system is waste. However, a generational transformation is happening right now to change this system.” Read More …

Chipping Away at Healthcare Special Interests Yet?

Is it just “One Step Forward and Two Steps Back?” or is something bigger happening?

Last week I read an excellent article in Huffington Post by Charles Francis, and it inspired today’s post about public interests versus special interests. In this article I’ll reflect on the healthcare progress consumers are making despite politicians working against them. But first, more on the obstacles we face.

Special Interests Pull Puppet Strings

In How Mindfulness Meditation Can Transform Health Care, Charles examines the need to change consumer behavior toward healthier lifestyles, so I thought about the role of incentives and awareness education. I’ve written about that before, but today I’ll take a broader look at the many factors influencing the health and productivity of our nation’s workforce and why I remain guardedly optimistic that we’ll overcome political corruption. Included are links to many related articles and this list of over 130 past articles on healthcare policy. Read More …

Replace Sitting with Walking

Grandparents walking down the beach together

Replace sitting with walking – it’s key to decreasing early death rate.

By Alfred Stallion

A lot of people would say that staying healthy is all about exercising more, drinking more water, taking vitamins, including more fish oil into your diet, and quitting smoking and drinking alcohol. However, there’s more to general health than adhering to a healthy lifestyle. The key to long-term health is to replace sitting down with mild walking. Apparently, this will decrease your chances of suffering an early death by 12 to 14 percent. Read More …

Another Essay on Health Reform and Insurance

Why is Health Insurance So Expensive?

By Jon N. Hall, 8/13/2015 (see full article)

“If insurance actuaries could predict with certainty that every year every house in Kansas would be destroyed by a tornado, how much would a Kansan be charged to insure his house against tornado damage? … After all, insurance is a business, not welfare; businesses exist to make profit.”

American Health Care is Snake Bit
The article makes the point that insurance always costs more than paying out-of-pocket if what is being insured is a certainty, and it argues that that’s what health insurance has become – essentially prepaid medical care. It concludes by saying, “If America wants to preserve the private health insurance business, then private health insurance policies need to revert back to being ‘catastrophic insurance,’ just as in the days of old. That means we’d all be paying more out-of-pocket.

Beyond that, the author offered no recommendations, so I chimed in with my own. Read More …

How can we make healthcare more productive?

How can we make healthcare more productive? was the topic of a LinkedIn discussion started by Joe Flower, author of the book, “Healthcare Beyond Reform: Doing It Right For Half The Cost.” It generated some lively discussion and prompted me to respond as well.

My response to How can we make healthcare more productive?

MotivationCHANGE THE TERMINOLOGY – America has excellent MEDICAL Care, if you can afford it, but we have a horrible HEALTH Care system and desperately need to focus more on health & wellness. We spend twice as much as other nations but still live sicker and die younger, per the WHO. That means we “should” be able to cut costs in half at least while simultaneously improving care quality, patient satisfaction, worker productivity, and GDP.

START WITH EDUCATION – We now teach new doctors how to diagnose and treat illness & injury, not how to prevent it, and that feeds into our fee-for-service SICK Care system that profits from doing more – more tests, more procedures, more drugs. Little time is spent teaching medical students about public health and the pillars of health (exercise, nutrition & sleep), because that doesn’t fit into our for-profit business models. Read More …

Mysterious World of Sleep

 

Woman sleeping in bed (Getty Images/Tetra Images RF)

Woman sleeping in bed (Getty Images/Tetra Images RF)

The Mysterious World of Sleep

Byline article by Tom Allon (original in Huffington Post)

I’ve been thinking a lot about sleep lately. It’s a topic many complain about and discuss occasionally with friends and family, but it still remains a very mysterious topic to most people around the world.

After air, water and food, it’s probably the most essential thing in our lives to ensure our health and daily functioning. And although it’s self evident, it bears repeating that almost all humans spend one third of their lives (25-30 years) sleeping. Read More …

Insurance Cost = Premiums + Deductibles + Copays

Obamacare Enrollment Drive

MIAMI, FL – FEBRUARY 05: Aymara Marchante (L) and Wiktor Garcia sit with Maria Elena Santa Coloma, an insurance advisor with UniVista Insurance company, as they sign up for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, before the February 15th deadline on February 5, 2015 in Miami, Florida. Numbers released by the government show that the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach metropolitan area has signed up 637,514 consumers so far since open enrollment began on Nov. 15, which is more than twice as many as the next large metropolitan area, Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

OPINION by Wayne Caswell, founder & senior editor, Modern Health Talk

This is an obvious opinion piece that I posted on Huffington Post in response to another opinion piece, It’s Not Just You — Those Health Insurance Deductibles Are Getting Scary.

MY RESPONSE:

The article was well written but misleading because it failed to acknowledge that Total Insurance Cost = Premiums + Deductibles + Copays. Instead, it focused almost exclusively on high deductibles. Read More …

Why Color and Light Matter

Secrets for Improving your Sleep, Health & Productivity:
Why Color and Light Matter

by Leanne Venier, BSME, CP AOBTA

(From her LinkedIn article. Also Published under “Research” in Texas MD Magazine, April/May 2015 (sold throughout Texas) & in TexasMDMonthly.com)

Leanne Venier - Luminous Tranquility

Pictured Above: “Luminous Tranquility” by Leanne Venier- LeanneVenier.com

It’s 7 am. The alarm clock starts blaring and you groggily reach over to swat it into snooze-ville, wishing for nothing more than an extra hour of sleep. Lately, you just never feel rested in the morning although you go to bed plenty early every night. Read More …

IBM Watson Health: Transforming Healthcare

Watson Health: Empowering Patients and Transforming Healthcare

IBM WatsonBy Kyu Rhee, MD, MPP

There was an interesting decision to make within IBM about what to call a new business organization that we’re announcing today [4/13/2015]. Should it be named Watson Health or Watson Healthcare? [emphasis added]

“Health” is an aspiration, for individuals and society. “Healthcare” describes an industry primarily focused on treating diseases.

While healthcare is essential, it represents just one of many factors that determine whether people live long and healthy lives. Some other critical factors are genetics, geography, behaviors, social/environmental influences, education, and economics.  Unless society takes all of these factors into account and puts the individual at the center of the healthcare system, we won’t be able to make large-scale progress in helping people feel better and live longer. So, IBM Watson Health it is. Read More …